Trying to find an aircraft


#1

Does anyone know of a few ways for looking up an aircraft registration? I would like to see if I could track a country singer’s private jet. I tried googling it without any luck. I also tried searching the FAA registry, but it must be listed under a pseudo company name. The only other thing I could think of was searching airliners.net, but once again no luck as of yet. I’m pretty sure he bought a Learjet last year (don’t know the model), and I know it flew on June 9th from New York to Nashville, because he was doing a GMA interview/concert and then did a concert in Nashville that night. Thanks…


#2

You can go to the FAA’s Aircraft Registry to search by various criteria.

The aircraft you are looking for may be registered under a generic name like N132 LLC or under the name of another company. The guy may even charter aircraft or use a fractional company such as NetJets to fly around in.

There’s a good possibility that if you do find the aircraft you won’t be able to track it because it is blocked (see the Questions/Answers section).

He could even fly commercial airlines.

Just read not too long ago that Google doesn’t like being a verb so you can’t “google” something. Rather, they want you to say that you used Google to find something.


#3

Good think I don’t care what Google says. ‘Google’ as a verb has become part of the public lexicon, and they can’t do anything about it.


#4

Kinda silly of them, do they actually think people are going to stop using google as a verb? Once a word enters the common verancular it is not going to be easily changed by a corporate policy.
As jreeves mentioned a while back Adobe doesn’t want “photoshop” to be a verb either. They have a whole document describing how they want people to use the name. A person can’t photoshop a picture, “the image was enhanced using Adobe Photoshop software”

[Edit: I really have to stop watching TV when I’m trying to post a reply. it takes me too long. Great minds think alike Newark]


#5

They do indeed. 8)


#6

This attempt to protect a genericized trademark name will be as much of an exercise in futility for Google as it was for Xerox, Kleenex, Scotch tape, Escalator, Hoover, Allen wrench, Aspirin, etc., etc.


#7

Google is actually in the dictionary as a verb!
http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/google
It’s waaaaaay too late for them to do anything about it. My advice to them is, “Get used to it!”