TFR!


#1

A TFR just came out for the Manchester,NH area! Be Alert! It kills me to see pilots that aren’t familiar with an area and accidently bust airspaces; then see them get thrown down on a runway by agents. Like in the case with the DC ADIZ. Safe Flying To All!


#2

Tarmac rash may be the least of your worries…
From 2/3/06 AOPA ePilot

“AIR FORCE SAYS IT WILL SHOOT SUPER BOWL TFR VIOLATORS
No doubt about it, they’re serious about security around this Sunday’s Super Bowl in Detroit. Some 10,000 security officers will be carefully watching 67,000 spectators at the game. Radiation and explosives detectors will be deployed at all of the approaches to Ford Field. And the super security includes the air. Both the United States and Canada have issued presidential-sized TFRs encircling the stadium out to 30 nautical miles and up to 18,000 feet. Inside that is a 10 nm no-fly zone that will be patrolled by Air Force fighters. “We’re the last line of defense,” Lt. Col. Bill Hargrove told ABC News Wednesday. When correspondent Pierre Thomas asked if he was prepared to take the order to shoot down a non-responsive civilian aircraft entering the inner ring, he answered, “Absolutely!” AOPA urges pilots to exercise extreme caution.”


#3

A 1:6.7 ratio of security:attendees is amazing. The cost per person just for the security people (not counting the technology) at the game is probably $10 per ticket.


#4

I have to think that the terrorists wouldn’t strike at events like this, simply because they know we’re “ready”. I have a feeling any future attacks will be when we least expect it and on targets that are vulnerable because no one deems them to be likely targets.

Let’s hope all future plans are stopped by our intel though.


#5

Yeah i agree. I know we all complain about new security hassels but its worth it; lets hope that we never need to test it.


#6

Yeah i got this email. Thank god i dont live in Michigan and have to conduct air travel that day. Thanks for the replies


#7

Just a simple call to a Flight Service station will solve any problems you might have with TFR. It also helps if you can file IFR as well. Flight service is usually pretty good about letting you know if a TRF is along your route of flight


#8

I would definately file IFR whenever possible to avoid TFR’s. There are many TFR’s that are not easy to find. Things have gotten better in the last 2 years or so, but I have had FSS neglect to inform me about TFR’s along my route 3 times. One time, the TFR covered the intended destination. I was notified about it by the FBO while setting a rental car up. I then called FSS again and specifically asked about any TFR’s at that airport and was told by a different briefer that there were no TFR’s in that area. Turns out that the briefers computer didn’t prompt him to tell me about it. Be careful, fly IFR, check all sources of info, monitor 121.5


#9

I’d encourage you and anyone else who experiences something like this to file an ASRS report about it. It’s bad enough that we get strung up by our thumbs for busting senseless TFRs, but if they don’t even tell us about them ahead of time we don’t stand a chance. ASRS is one effective way to provide feedback in to the system. Even if you didn’t bust the TFR (or break any other rules) if you see something that’s unsafe or broken, file a report!