NetJets


#1

I was browsing Airline Pilot Central last night and I saw one thing that stood out. The pilots make a killing!!! Like 2x more than airline pilots. Is this because it is a charter? Here is the link.

airlinepilotcentral.com/airlines … tjets.html

Edit: And what happens if you pass the first class medical but a few years later you don’t. Are you fired?


#2

This may have something to do with it:

*PILOT TRAINING

Pilots in the NetJets programs are the most experienced and best trained in the industry. In partnership with FlightSafety International, the world’s pre-eminent flight training corporation, we share a common philosophy: the best safety device in any aircraft is a well-trained crew.

High minimum qualifications

NetJets pilots average 9,000 hours of flight experience each. To be considered for an interview with NetJets, a pilot must have a minimum of 2,500 hours of flight experience, 500 hours flying multi-engine aircraft, 250 hours of instrument flying, an Airline Transport Pilot license, and a first class medical certificate.

**
Fly only one aircraft type**

The industry standard has been that a pilot can be "type-rated," that is, licensed to perform duties as pilot-in-command, in two or more types of aircraft without jeopardizing safety. At NetJets we believe it's much safer to have a specific pilot and co-pilot fly only one type of aircraft. In fact, when NetJets purchases aircraft types, they must have identical cockpit and instrumentation designs, so our pilots will be completely familiar with the controls of the specific aircraft type they fly.

Every flight has two pilots FAA type-rated as captain

All our pilots and co-pilots are FAA type-rated as captains in the one specific aircraft type they fly, whether they sit in the left or right seat of the cockpit.*

#3

And what happens if you pass the first class medical but a few years later you don’t. Are you fired?

If you can’t keep up your medical rating, you can’t fly. Simple, isn’t it?


#4

Simple but it sucks!


#5

So you’d like to have an unhealthy pilot? Doesn’t suck to me.


#6

Sucks if you can’t be the pilot! :wink: Cause of vision that can be corrected.


#7

It’s more than vision that can cause a pilot to lose his 1st class medical certificate.

Here’s what is required for a 1st class medical certificate:

Title 14: Aeronautics and Space
PART 67MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION

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Subpart BFirst-Class Airman Medical Certificate

67.101 Eligibility.

To be eligible for a first-class airman medical certificate, and to remain eligible for a first-class airman medical certificate, a person must meet the requirements of this subpart.

67.103 Eye.

Eye standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are:

(a) Distant visual acuity of 20/20 or better in each eye separately, with or without corrective lenses. If corrective lenses (spectacles or contact lenses) are necessary for 20/20 vision, the person may be eligible only on the condition that corrective lenses are worn while exercising the privileges of an airman certificate.

(b) Near vision of 20/40 or better, Snellen equivalent, at 16 inches in each eye separately, with or without corrective lenses. If age 50 or older, near vision of 20/40 or better, Snellen equivalent, at both 16 inches and 32 inches in each eye separately, with or without corrective lenses.

© Ability to perceive those colors necessary for the safe performance of airman duties.

(d) Normal fields of vision.

(e) No acute or chronic pathological condition of either eye or adnexa that interferes with the proper function of an eye, that may reasonably be expected to progress to that degree, or that may reasonably be expected to be aggravated by flying.

(f) Bifoveal fixation and vergence-phoria relationship sufficient to prevent a break in fusion under conditions that may reasonably be expected to occur in performing airman duties. Tests for the factors named in this paragraph are not required except for persons found to have more than 1 prism diopter of hyperphoria, 6 prism diopters of esophoria, or 6 prism diopters of exophoria. If any of these values are exceeded, the Federal Air Surgeon may require the person to be examined by a qualified eye specialist to determine if there is bifoveal fixation and an adequate vergence-phoria relationship. However, if otherwise eligible, the person is issued a medical certificate pending the results of the examination.

67.105 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are:

(a) The person shall demonstrate acceptable hearing by at least one of the following tests:

(1) Demonstrate an ability to hear an average conversational voice in a quiet room, using both ears, at a distance of 6 feet from the examiner, with the back turned to the examiner.

(2) Demonstrate an acceptable understanding of speech as determined by audiometric speech discrimination testing to a score of at least 70 percent obtained in one ear or in a sound field environment.

(3) Provide acceptable results of pure tone audiometric testing of unaided hearing acuity according to the following table of worst acceptable thresholds, using the calibration standards of the American National Standards Institute, 1969 (11 West 42d Street, New York, NY 10036):


                                            500   1000   2000   3000
            Frequency (Hz)                   Hz    Hz     Hz     Hz

Better ear (Db)… 35 30 30 40
Poorer ear (Db)… 35 50 50 60

(b) No disease or condition of the middle or internal ear, nose, oral cavity, pharynx, or larynx that

(1) Interferes with, or is aggravated by, flying or may reasonably be expected to do so; or

(2) Interferes with, or may reasonably be expected to interfere with, clear and effective speech communication.

© No disease or condition manifested by, or that may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium.

67.107 Mental.

Mental standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are:

(a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of any of the following:

(1) A personality disorder that is severe enough to have repeatedly manifested itself by overt acts.

(2) A psychosis. As used in this section, psychosis refers to a mental disorder in which:

(i) The individual has manifested delusions, hallucinations, grossly bizarre or disorganized behavior, or other commonly accepted symptoms of this condition; or

(ii) The individual may reasonably be expected to manifest delusions, hallucinations, grossly bizarre or disorganized behavior, or other commonly accepted symptoms of this condition.

(3) A bipolar disorder.

(4) Substance dependence, except where there is established clinical evidence, satisfactory to the Federal Air Surgeon, of recovery, including sustained total abstinence from the substance(s) for not less than the preceding 2 years. As used in this section

(i) Substance includes: Alcohol; other sedatives and hypnotics; anxiolytics; opioids; central nervous system stimulants such as cocaine, amphetamines, and similarly acting sympathomimetics; hallucinogens; phencyclidine or similarly acting arylcyclohexylamines; cannabis; inhalants; and other psychoactive drugs and chemicals; and

(ii) Substance dependence means a condition in which a person is dependent on a substance, other than tobacco or ordinary xanthine-containing (e.g., caffeine) beverages, as evidenced by

(A) Increased tolerance;

(B) Manifestation of withdrawal symptoms;

© Impaired control of use; or

(D) Continued use despite damage to physical health or impairment of social, personal, or occupational functioning.

(b) No substance abuse within the preceding 2 years defined as:

(1) Use of a substance in a situation in which that use was physically hazardous, if there has been at any other time an instance of the use of a substance also in a situation in which that use was physically hazardous;

(2) A verified positive drug test result, an alcohol test result of 0.04 or greater alcohol concentration, or a refusal to submit to a drug or alcohol test required by the U.S. Department of Transportation or an agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation; or

(3) Misuse of a substance that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on case history and appropriate, qualified medical judgment relating to the substance involved, finds

(i) Makes the person unable to safely perform the duties or exercise the privileges of the airman certificate applied for or held; or

(ii) May reasonably be expected, for the maximum duration of the airman medical certificate applied for or held, to make the person unable to perform those duties or exercise those privileges.

© No other personality disorder, neurosis, or other mental condition that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified medical judgment relating to the condition involved, finds

(1) Makes the person unable to safely perform the duties or exercise the privileges of the airman certificate applied for or held; or

(2) May reasonably be expected, for the maximum duration of the airman medical certificate applied for or held, to make the person unable to perform those duties or exercise those privileges.

[Doc. No. 27940, 61 FR 11256, Mar. 19, 1996, as amended by Amdt. 6719, 71 FR 35764, June 21, 2006]

67.109 Neurologic.

Neurologic standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are:

(a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of any of the following:

(1) Epilepsy;

(2) A disturbance of consciousness without satisfactory medical explanation of the cause; or

(3) A transient loss of control of nervous system function(s) without satisfactory medical explanation of the cause.

(b) No other seizure disorder, disturbance of consciousness, or neurologic condition that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified medical judgment relating to the condition involved, finds

(1) Makes the person unable to safely perform the duties or exercise the privileges of the airman certificate applied for or held; or

(2) May reasonably be expected, for the maximum duration of the airman medical certificate applied for or held, to make the person unable to perform those duties or exercise those privileges.

67.111 Cardiovascular.

Cardiovascular standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are:

(a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of any of the following:

(1) Myocardial infarction;

(2) Angina pectoris;

(3) Coronary heart disease that has required treatment or, if untreated, that has been symptomatic or clinically significant;

(4) Cardiac valve replacement;

(5) Permanent cardiac pacemaker implantation; or

(6) Heart replacement;

(b) A person applying for first-class medical certification must demonstrate an absence of myocardial infarction and other clinically significant abnormality on electrocardiographic examination:

(1) At the first application after reaching the 35th birthday; and

(2) On an annual basis after reaching the 40th birthday.

© An electrocardiogram will satisfy a requirement of paragraph (b) of this section if it is dated no earlier than 60 days before the date of the application it is to accompany and was performed and transmitted according to acceptable standards and techniques.

67.113 General medical condition.

The general medical standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are:

(a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other hypoglycemic drug for control.

(b) No other organic, functional, or structural disease, defect, or limitation that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified medical judgment relating to the condition involved, finds

(1) Makes the person unable to safely perform the duties or exercise the privileges of the airman certificate applied for or held; or

(2) May reasonably be expected, for the maximum duration of the airman medical certificate applied for or held, to make the person unable to perform those duties or exercise those privileges.

© No medication or other treatment that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified medical judgment relating to the medication or other treatment involved, finds

(1) Makes the person unable to safely perform the duties or exercise the privileges of the airman certificate applied for or held; or

(2) May reasonably be expected, for the maximum duration of the airman medical certificate applied for or held, to make the person unable to perform those duties or exercise those privileges.

67.115 Discretionary issuance.

A person who does not meet the provisions of 67.103 through 67.113 may apply for the discretionary issuance of a certificate under 67.401.


#8

Im SCREWED.


#9

“(2) A psychosis: The individual has manifested delusions, hallucinations, grossly bizarre or disorganized behavior, or other commonly accepted symptoms of this condition.”

It can’t be that hard, I managed to get mine!


#10

Have a history of high blood pressure in family and my vision stinks.


#11

Anyone care to explain the bold part. I don’t quite understand how they do it.

(b) Near vision of 20/40 or better, Snellen equivalent, at 16 inches in each eye separately, with or without corrective lenses. If age 50 or older, near vision of 20/40 or better, Snellen equivalent, at both 16 inches and 32 inches in each eye separately, with or without corrective lenses.


#12

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snellen_chart

and

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visual_acuity


#13

I see now. Basically they take it from 16 inches and 20ft. Assuming its a small one for 16 inches.


#14

I looked over dami’s medical list and somehow I didn’t see flatulence as a medical disqualifier. However, I was once told that it was a no-no to release jet fuel in the cabin or cockpit.

In the ‘glory days’ of passenger aviation, one wasn’t fired for failing the medical. One couldn’t fly the plane, but a desk job could generally be found. I don’t think that happens today.


#15

Well… at least I still qualify! :smiley:


#16

The pilots make a killing!!! Like 2x more than airline pilots.<<

What do you mean by “a killing”?? And 2x more than what airline pilots? Do you mean Regional air carrier pilots? Or mainline??

Is this because it is a charter?<<

Not charter, fractional.


#17

My brother is a Netjets Hawker pilot, and I’d call him MR Safety! He’s very detail oriented, and has tons of hours flying SEL, rotorcraft (army) MEL, and now jets. Netjets gives very thorough initial training, and frequent recurrent training…all at Flight Safety. The aircrew are (now) well paid. They are union (teamsters) and won their recent strike against Netjets. My brothers pay was nearly doubled! I think he’s worth every penny. :smiley:


#18

As Skelly noted, the NetJets pilots finally, after 4 or 5 years, won a pay raise. As for making a killing, it’s hardly true. The pay grades at NetJets are just now somewhat competive with charter and corporate jobs and are still significantly less than airline pilots flying a line slot ( not reserve) for any of the major or national carriers. A fifth year FO at a major is making right around $100,000 a year. Plus, airline pilots aren’t flight planning, stocking the ice, coffee, sodas, etc…, carrying bags, and all the other fun stuff that comes with being a charter dog. Don’t get me wrong, airline guys earn every cent they make, it’s just two totally different operations. When you figure the fact that at LEAST half your nights a month will be in a hotel and that your per-diem probably doesn’t cover the cost of food at most of the popular destinations, it’s hardly the glamourous jetset life.


#19

Trafly is right on. My brother is currently doing the 7 days on-7days off rotation. He is an expert traveler, for he is gone from home half the time. The Hawkers have no cockpit door, so the pax can view the action…sorta. Some pax (owners) even bring their pets. Considering the thousands of hours flying and the awesome responsibility he has, I’d say my bro earns his pay. That Netjets lady-pilot at Reno sure earned hers!
Consider also that, unlike the majors- Netjets can and does fly outta nearly 5000 airports nationwide and even does some international work…the bro was recently in Bermuda and later Canada…in the same day!


#20

There was never any strike at NetJets.