Gulfstream II, not your mother's drug runner..............


#1

chinapost.com.tw/news/2007/0 … rrying.htm

pprune.org/forums/showthread.php?p=3600870

flightaware.com/live/flight/N987SA


#2

airliners.net/search/photo.s … rds=N987sa

I’m on the hunt for any video of the chase/crash, should be pretty amazing!


#3


CLICK HERE for LiveLeak video of the crash site.


#4

Sheesh, that’s a load and a half. Think of all the kids who benefited from not having used that load. Where’s Crockett and Tubbs when you need’m.


#5

Somewhere in Washington, DC, there’s an ex-mayor who is yelling, “NOOOOOoooooo!”… http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b8/CheckM8/cry.gif


#6

I thought that was Amy Winehouse…no, no, nooo


#7

:laughing:


#8

Given the lack of fire, do you think they ran out of fuel?


#9

Oh God…here we go again…where’s flyboy at? This was such a lighthearted and fun discussion…damn!

:smiley:

Chris


#10

One of the articles mentioned that they “circled the city” for 2 hours before crashing. So either they knew they were going to crash land this thing and didn’t want themselves or the “cargo” to burn. Or, the pilot actually performed the proper weight and balance calculations and only put 2 hours of fuel on board, figured out the proper speeds and made sure the flaps were properly configured for his low level drug flight. :unamused: Or, the pilot sampled a little of the cargo in flight, thought the red button launched the missles but instead dumped fuel…duuuuuuuuude!

What’s interesting to me is the flight track history, Salt Lake City? Wichita? Are these big cocaine distribution hubs? How many of the planes being tracked on FW right now are doing naughty things…hmmmmmmm!


#11

A mystery surrounds to the case of the airplane with drugs at Tixkokob

Third person stopped: a Colombian who was on the high ground.

In spite of the tight police secrecy that surrounds to the case of the narco airplane at Tixkokob. Some new details were revealed yesterday that fortify the hypothesis that it indicates that the narcotics traffickers had contacts in Quintana Roo as in Yucatan as much.

The authorities arrested a third person, apparently a Colombian, who had taken shelter in high ground at Tixkokob near the place where the airplane crash landed than three tons of cocaine destined for Cancn.

The South American, one the crew of the airplane - the other a woman, was taken from the scene at seven at night with the face covered to the facilities of the PGR in Mrida. Where there are also two yucatecans who were arrested yesterday after acting suspiciously near the crash site.

It was known that the soldiers of the Army acted practically single handedly in the operation of the seizure, without the aid of federal or state police, in order to ensure there was no infiltration.


#12

MEXICO
Florida pilots linked to crashed drug jet
The four tons of cocaine found aboard the plane that crashed on the Yucatn Peninsula belonged to Mexico’s biggest drug dealer.
Posted on Sun, Sep. 30, 2007Digg del.icio.us AIM reprint print email
BY JAY ROOT AND KEVIN G. HALL
McClatchy News Service

MEXICO CITY – The four tons of cocaine found aboard a U.S.-registered business jet that crashed in Mexico’s Yucatn Peninsula on Monday belonged to Joaquin ‘‘El Chapo’’ Guzmn, this country’s most notorious drug trafficker, according to Mexican authorities.

The business jet that was transporting the dope to Mexico from Colombia was purchased just a week before the crash by a U.S. pilot with a history of legal and financial problems in Florida, interviews and official records indicate, but whether the pilot still owned the plane at the time of its crash is unknown.

$23 BILLION TRADE

The complex sale of the Gulfstream II jet and its end in the Mexican jungle highlight the increasingly complicated illicit drug trade. A recent report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office said the trade generates as much as $23 billion a year for drug cartels.

U.S. authorities say as much as 90 percent of the cocaine sold in the United States is shipped through Mexico.

At least three suspects, including a Mexican pilot, are in Mexican custody. Mexican authorities say two of the men offered them money if they would give back the cocaine and release any crew members.

The Gulfstream II departed Fort Lauderdale on Sept. 18. In the days between then and the plane’s crash, it apparently flew to Mexico, then to Colombia and was on its way back to Mexico when Mexican anti-drug aircraft intercepted it.

‘‘The cocaine was to be delivered to El Chapo,’’ said an official in the Mexican attorney general’s office, who spoke on condition of anonymity. ``We do know it was from Colombia.’’

Guzmn has acquired an almost mythical status in Mexico. After breaking out of jail in 2001, he has eluded capture repeatedly and is revered in some parts of this impoverished nation as a Robin Hood figure who distributes some of his gains to the poor.

How the U.S.-registered Gulfstream ended up in the hands of Guzmn’s violent Sinaloa Cartel isn’t clear.

A bill of sale obtained by McClatchy indicates that Florida pilot Clyde O’Connor bought the plane on Sept. 16 – eight days before it went down in the Yucatn jungle. Another Florida pilot, identified by his license number and signature as Greg Smith, also signed the document, but his relationship to O’Connor isn’t detailed.

According to electronic court records, O’Connor, 42, was found guilty of criminal safety violations – described as ‘‘improper/insufficient safety equipment or lights’’ – in 2001. Records also show two bankruptcy filings, one in 1997 and another in 1998.

PREVIOUS OWNERS

Two Brazilians – the last registered owners of the plane – said O’Connor wired them $2 million to purchase the business jet earlier this month.

Attempts to reach O’Connor and Smith weren’t successful; the listed phone number for one of O’Connor’s companies, Execstar Aviation in Fort Lauderdale, was disconnected.

Interviewed by phone, one of the Brazilians, Joao Luiz Malago, said Friday that O’Connor and Smith had told him they planned to resell the aircraft.

Logs found on a plane-tracking website, wwwflightaware.com, show that a flight plan was filed for the Gulfstream two days later for a trip from Fort Lauderdale to Cancn, but who piloted the craft is unknown.

FAA records show that neither O’Connor nor Smith was certified to fly a multiengine aircraft like the Gulfstream. The plane crashed near Merida, 200 miles from Cancn.


#13

madcowprod.com/10292007.html


#14

The internet has become an abyss :unamused:


#15

Betcha all that coke is out on the streets by now, and the families of Mexican authorities will be having a very merry Christmas this year! :wink:


#16

Mystery of Drug Plane Deepens
Wednesday, January 02, 2008 - FreeMarketNews.com

A pilot arrested while awaiting the ill-fated landing in Mexico of the DC9 airliner carrying 5.5 tons of cocaine 18 months ago committed suicide by hanging himself this week with his socks, in the maximum security Altiplano prison facility outside Mexico City. The death of Marco Antonio Perez Gracia is just the latest to be blamed on the scandal surrounding the DC9 (N900SA) airliner, as well as a Gulfstream II (N987SA) business jet which crash-landed and broke into three pieces in September in Mexico, spilling 4 tons of cocaine across a muddy field 25 km outside Merida. Adding to the intrigue, Narco News reported last week that Gregory D. Smith, one of two Fort Lauderdale FL charter pilots left holding the bag as the last registered owners of the Gulfstream II business jet (Cocaine Two) busted in Mexico with 4 tons of cocaine, worked for the CIA and DEA as a pilot during the late 1990’s. -Mad Cow Morning News

Wikipedia N900SA , and full news story Click Here.


#17

…left holding the bag…

Great choice of words!


#18

Next time I’m on a Gulfstream I’m going to make it a point to sit over the wing.


#19

Narco News Bulletin reporting on the war on drugs and democracy in Latin America.


#20

Narco News Update from March 11/08.