FlightAware Discussions

Replacing old RPi with new

Greetings,

I just put a newer RPi together. All I need it to move antenna to the new RPi and update the ID.

I have read this FAQ.
flightaware.com/adsb/faq#piawaremovesite

I am curious what this means:

Note: Stats cannot be moved on FlightFeeders, due to the replacement device having a different serial number.

As far as I can tell, I will lose my old site number of 3637 and have to use 163323. If true, that is a bummer. I like my low number!

Best regards,
Fred

That note is referring to FlightFeeders (hardware supplied by FlightAware), not piaware installs.

You can retain the old site with a piaware by configuring your new install with the old site’s feeder ID. Copy the “unique identifier” from the old site’s stats page, then set feeder-id on the new install to that UUID:

piaware-config feeder-id d9635a94-alltheotherdigitshere

and reboot or restart piaware.

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Thank you for the explanation!
Cool! I do like the low site number. :grinning:

Best regards,
Fred

I started feeding FlightAware eight days after you (site 3731). :slightly_smiling_face:

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@obj When did FlightAware start? Did they use Piaware from the start, or just FlightFeeders?

Before PiAware, I was feeding PlanePlotter and feeding FlightAware was an easy addition.
I think that PiAware (RPi) was before any FlightAware boxes. I think it followed the release/fork of dump1090 by Malcolm.

The cheap SDR receivers were a game changer. I was looking at the Beast (and still do occasionally) but couldn’t justify the cost (still can’t). My first soon to be replaced system is using my first original RTL receiver and the RPi 1B(?). I was going to look at it this morning. It has two USB ports and a 36 pin connector. Overtime, I added an antenna and filter. I have the orange receiver but never used it since I recalled a lot of steps to get the first running. Now I will be using it all. Just for kicks I am purchasing the 978MHz antenna.

Best regards,
Fred

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  1. ADS-B coverage started some time around 2011-2012, with PiAware in 2013.

There were a small number of FlightAware-provided ADS-B receivers that FlightAware built before PiAware, but PiAware was when the first real push for widespread crowdsourced ADS-B coverage started.

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I set the feeder ID.

I have no data. In a bit of investigation, it appears piaware-config.txt is empty. Apparently I missed a step. I thought the receivier, etc. would be included. Is there a command line script to set various parameters?

Thank you!
Fred

pi@PiAware:~ $ piaware-config
allow-auto-updates             yes                            # value set at /etc/piaware.conf:7
allow-manual-updates           yes                            # value set at /etc/piaware.conf:8
feeder-id                      my feeder-id  # value set at /etc/piaware.conf:9
pi@PiAware:~ $

https://discussions.flightaware.com/t/for-beginners-how-to-get-back-existing-station-number-in-a-fresh-install/30981

As an experiment, I copied the contents of the sample. I now have the following. I am using a wired connection.

pi@PiAware:~ $ piaware-config
allow-auto-updates             yes                            # value set at /boot/piaware-config.txt:67
allow-manual-updates           yes                            # value set at /boot/piaware-config.txt:71
allow-mlat                     yes                            # value set at /boot/piaware-config.txt:75
allow-modeac                   yes                            # value set at /boot/piaware-config.txt:79
feeder-id                      d9*********** # value set at /etc/piaware.conf:9
rtlsdr-gain                    max                            # value set at /boot/piaware-config.txt:60
wired-network                  yes                            # value set at /boot/piaware-config.txt:27
wireless-network               no                             # value set at /boot/piaware-config.txt:33
wireless-password              <hidden>                       # value set at /boot/piaware-config.txt:49
wireless-ssid                  MyWifiNetwork                  # value set at /boot/piaware-config.txt:48
pi@PiAware:~ $

That does not appear to be the problem since I did that.

More sleuthing.
It appears dump1090 is NOT running even though installed.

pi@PiAware:~ $ sudo piaware-status
PiAware master process (piaware) is running with pid 3028.
PiAware ADS-B client (faup1090) is not running.
PiAware ADS-B UAT client (faup978) is not running (disabled by configuration settings)
PiAware mlat client (fa-mlat-client) is not running.
Local ADS-B receiver (dump1090) is not running.

no program appears to be listening for ES connections on port 30005.
faup1090 is NOT connected to the ADS-B receiver.
piaware is connected to FlightAware.

got 'couldn't open socket: connection refused'
dump1090 is NOT producing data on localhost:30005.

Your feeder ID is blah-blah-blah (configured at /etc/piaware.conf:9)
pi@PiAware:~ $

I created a new instance, this time using the PiAware img. Results are the same dump1090 is not running.

Stumped!
Fred

Ok, after check down several rabbit holes, it appears the USB port on the RPi is faulty. First time for that!
After moving the receiver, it appears things are working.

Thanks for checking and reading this thread! Hopefully others might learn to check the USB ports when debugging. :wink:

Best regards,
Fred

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good to know you are up and runnign now :wink:

Thanks! Good history lesson.