Fly From US to Canada (Seattle to Victoria)


#1

Hello!

I’m an instrument private pilot visiting Seattle and hoping to get some air time while here. Canada is so close, I’d love to fly up that way (Victoria?) but never flown outside the States. Does anyone know any details/howtos on this? I plan to call some local FBOs for rentals tomorrow, but trying to research this tonight.

Thanks for any tips!


#2

My advice is to hire a pro pilot for the whole trip. You’re going to have to do a minimum 1hr checkout. The weather forecast is not pleasant and your route is over salt water with a lot of changing weather patterns in that area. Going to Canada and coming back requires extra planning.

You might want to consider taking a ferry. Do you have your passport with you? Clouds are at 400-600 feet right now. You won’t see anything from an airplane.


#3

Generally speaking, operations from the US to Canada are easy. All this is about to change with new regulations, so now would be a good time to have a go. AOPA has great resources for this info.


#4

Call 1-800-CAM-PASS to get a customs clearance. it’s as easy as that


#5

Or, you could call 1-800-CAN-PASS :smiley:

You have to take into account the requirements for coming back in to the U.S. Going to Canada is easy, coming back is a little more involved. You must choose the Airport of Entry closest to your point of border crossing and give prior notice to the Customs office there. Ie. you couldn’t fly direct from Vancouver to Portland without an overflight permit.
The following links have all the info you would need. Have fun!

aopa.org/members/pic/intl/ca … efing.html

aopa.org/members/airports/pd … al_ops.pdf


#6

BLAH- maybe that’s why I couldn’t get a hold of them last time I was in CAN.

Also you can fly from Vancouver to Portland and never have to see a customs agent.


#7

This won’t affect your trip this week but here is something else brought to you by the same folks that gave us “take off your shoes and throw away your shampoo.” (from Universal Weather)

DHS Announces Updated APIS Rules for Part 91 Operators

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) recently announced additional measures to strengthen private aircraft security. New Advance Passenger Information System (APIS) submission requirements for Part 91 operators will require more detailed information on arriving and departing aircraft, as well as information about persons on board.

These new requirements are published in the Federal Register dated December 18, 2008; operators have until May 19, 2009 to become fully compliant.

Answers to many of your questions regarding the regulatory change are below. For more information, contact your Universal Team.
When do the new rules take effect?

The rules are published in the Federal Register dated December 18, 2008; operators have until May 19, 2009 to become fully compliant.

Who is affected?
All Part 91 operators will now be required to submit APIS manifests for ALL flights arriving into, or departing from, the United States. Previously, charter and commercial operators had these requirements only in the U.S. and in CARICOM countries.

What is my Part 91 operation required to do?

* Submit electronic manifest data for all people traveling on board your aircraft
* Submission due one hour prior to departure or arrival into/out of the U.S.
* Data must be filed through the Electronic Advanced Passenger Information System (eAPIS) or an approved alternate system. Universal's in-house transmission system has been tested and approved by both U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and Transportation Security Administration (TSA) for current APIS requirements:
      o Advance notice of arrival information
      o Advance notice of departure information
      o Aircraft identification information, including color scheme and decal number
      o Complete passenger and crew manifest
      o Operator information to include name and address

What are my options for submitting APIS transmissions?

* CBP's eAPIS transmission service
      o Online access
      o Manual entry - must key in data for every trip
* Universal APIS services
      o Complete turn-key service
      o Secure proprietary system programmed for APIS compliance
* Another approved third-party transmitter

What types of fines or penalties could I face if my operation does not comply with the new APIS rules?
Fines and penalties for non-compliance with the new APIS requirements will be substantial. Depending on the type of violation, the CBP fines for APIS non-compliance will likely begin at $5,000.00.


#8

:open_mouth:

Thats Cheating :exclamation:

We have to do it all on our own, including the importing/exporting the special equipment and State Dept. approvals :frowning:


#9

Us too!

I’m surprised that no one blasted me for saying you don’t need an overflight permit to go from Vancouver to Portland


#10

More fun to wait for you to try it! :laughing:


#11

Done it 100’s of times


#12

I’ve heard ICE are power tripping pricks around the area in question. Don’t be early, late or allow a part of your aircraft to hang out of their little box.


#13

+1.


#14

Could it maybe be that your company has an overflight permit like most 135 companies??? I’ve overflown lots of U.S. airports coming in international, but not without a waiver. You might get away with it sometimes, but those Customs agents can get nasty.


#15

Could it maybe be that your company has an overflight permit like most 135 companies??? I’ve overflown lots of U.S. airports coming in international, but not without a waiver. You might get away with it sometimes, but those Customs agents can get nasty.


#16

No- It’s cause I learned to fly at 59$ (closed last year) which is in Vancouver WASHINGTON. which is just on the other side if the Columbia river, from Portland Or.