FA Track Drops, Will They Be Picked Back Up???


#1

With everyone asking about the flight tracks being cut off when going out of the FA serivce area, I came up with this question.

Will FA pick the track back up on the same flight when it re-enters the service area? I looked (briefly, market I buy in is finally starting to take off) for some flights that might be like this in the Canada area, but didn’t find any. I am especially interested in flightaware.com/live/flight/N86RL for the leg from MYNN to TFFG. FIL & his best friend will leave the FA service area at some point, but should come back in around Puerto Rico. Will FA pick them back up and start the track?

They are heading to St. Barts for some special endorsement to land there with a stop at SXM for what I have heard they call “Heavy Hour” instead of “Happy Hour” at the bar on the beach. Man, I need to start my own company…


#2

Looking through the tracklog, I don’t see any significant service interruptions for the MYNN-TFFG flight.


#3

Yea, I was going to put an edit on my previous post that it didn’t happen, which in a way, surprised me. I thought for sure it would be lost at some point. Anyway, would FA pick them back up IF the track had been lost?


#4

I’m not sure what you mean by lost. Flights over the ocean routinely go for about an hour without any position reports. As long as we don’t receive an arrival message and the enroute time isn’t too far over the filed flight time (I forget the actual limit), we assume the flight is still in the air.

This flight to Hawaii is a good example of periodic position reports:


05:20PM    33.57 	-122.32 	444 	33300 
05:21PM 	33.52 	-122.45 	438 	34600 
05:22PM 	33.48 	-122.57 	433 	35000 
05:44PM 	33.07 	-124.52 	445 	35000
05:44PM 	33.07 	-124.52 	445 	35000
06:45PM 	30.63 	-133.67 	482 	35000
06:46PM 	30.63 	-133.67 	473 	35000
08:01PM 	26.83 	-144.20 	427 	35000
08:01PM 	26.83 	-144.20 	434 	35000
09:09PM 	23.02 	-152.53 	410 	35000
09:10PM 	22.97 	-152.65 	420 	35000
09:11PM 	22.92 	-152.77 	410 	35000


#5

Sorry. I guess when I mean “lost” i mean the track disappears. Uh, let’s see…

OK. We’ll use this one: flightaware.com/live/flight/N184R as an example.

Let’s say for S&G that FA has radar service in the LPAZ area. The track looks like this because 184R is “lost” due to being out of a service area for more than an hour. The track disappears, or ends (like in the example), however, because there is service for FA in the LPAZ area, normal flights in that area would be tracked. Would the cute little green line be filled in where it was “lost,” or would it be broken, starting back up where FA would normally track it?

Does that make sense, because I just made myself go crosseyed.


#6

Uh - oh! Watch those abbreviations Pik!

Don’t want to send Dami further round the bend… :wink:


#7

If the FAA had coverage in LPAZ, then we should pick it up and connect the points, just like we do for Hawaii flights.


#8

OK, in skimming all the posts about Hawaii, I missed the part about connecting the two lines. Oops…DON’T KILL ME DAMI!!!


#9

Hate to bring up this old topic but I came across an example of the exact situation that you mentioned Pika.
This flight: here, and the one before it: here.
I’m assuming the track was dropped when it crossed into Canadian airspace, and then a new track begins immediately after. (edit: when I first posted this I thought the track was missing the “piece” that was over Canada, now I see that it picks up at the same position, just in a different “flight”) Both flights showed “Enroute” at the same time and the time remaining until landing was the same, just the track was interrupted.
Mduell, this is certainly unusual as you said it should just fill in the missing data. It must have been something strange that ATC did with the flight plan or something…?


#10

Crossing USA->Canada (and sometimes Canada->USA) generates a second departure message. If we get two departure messages for the same flight without an arrival between them, you’ll see two enroute flights in the Activity Log.


#11

Interesting. Thanks Mark.