DANGEROUS AIRLINER MANUEVERS!!!!!


#1

cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/player/ … 3&src=news

saw this on anet…too good to pass up.


#2

Vid did not play for me, however commercial for Scottrade did. Yahoo sux


#3

since when is a go around dangerous??


#4

I’d rather go around then hit traffic on the ground. The airlines are trying to save money while keeping customers satisfied, so they tell the media that they will eliminate go-arounds, and this video would convince most of the American public that they are unsafe.


#5

Why is a go around dangerous? I have been an Air Traffic Controller for 5 years and I am also a pilot and a go around is no different than an arrival and a departure. The only thing different is the timing of when a go-around is initiated. Obviously, if the procedure is initiated late, then there is a greater chance of an incident, but fundamentally, a go-around is not dangerous.

It pains me that some passenger, who doesn’t have a clue about air traffic procedures, couldn’t find a cockpit if he had to and generally doesn’t have a clue is now an expert on go-arounds. :unamused: What made him an expert?..cuz he sat in the back of a 737 eating his peanuts and drinking his coke while the pilot and air traffic controller worked to keep him alive?

Jeez, our media sux.
Why give this idiot a platform when he doesn’t have a clue.


#6

Just another indication of what the media knows about anything. I am sure they are just trying to stir the pot/increase viewers.


#7

:unamused: oh brother :unamused:

Where are the “aviation experts” at these networks and news outlets!? , they’ve been in the industry since before PSA airlines smiled, and they have more experience than all of us blah blah blah…where are those guys for reports like this?


#8

gotta love the media’s aviation reporting.


#9

Stupid pilots. Why can’t those Gods land the thing right the first time. I say you try to put it down once you keep it down, no go arounds…

Says the media…


#10

Typical myopic AP drivel…Howard is an ignorant idiot!


#11

http://www.mercurynews.com/ci_9785651

Plane ‘go-arounds’ can be risky
PRACTICE REVIEWED
By David Porter
Associated Press
Article Launched: 07/04/2008 01:36:06 AM PDT


#12

About 80% sensationalism :unamused:


#13

from this quote at http://www.natca.net/mediacenter/press-release-detail.aspx?id=521
the men and women of the National Air Trafic Controllers Association, who proclaim - “We Guide You Home”, don’t like the GO-AROUND.

One TRACON controllers said it was the ugliest go-around they have seen in 24 years on the job.


#14

Where does it say that?


#15

I like them! 8)


#16

to quote Melvin S. Davis, a 22-year veteran and the facility representative for Terminal Radar Approach Control for Southern California, which serves airports in Los Angeles, Burbank, Ontario, Orange County, Palm Springs and San Diego.

There are intense amounts of stress in short bursts. … My daily routine is dealing with aircrafts that have anywhere between two and four hundred people on board, and that are traveling at about 600 miles an hour. They all have an objective - to get the airplane on the ground as quickly as possible. And I have to be the traffic cop. In the high-density terminal environment, there’s one individual who has to pull it all together, and that’s me,

http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1735387,00.html?imw=Y
In this very good discussion of runway capacity http://gettheflick.blogspot.com/2008/01/air-traffic-safety-vs-capacity.html
the author points out at your major airports, the airlines have maxed out capacity, and with each slot booked, it just takes one go around to fit back into that mix that has the potential to start one of those summer delays that had till this year become commonplace for the flying public.


#17

A terminal controller dealing with aircraft traveling 600mph eh?


#18

I don’t think the airports have to worry about slots or excess capacity. Airlines are cutting and shrinking.


#19

as I noted,

summer delays that had till this year become commonplace for the flying public.

:unamused:


#20

A Terminal Radar Approach Control or FAA TRACON in the United States) is an Air Traffic Control facility usually located within the vicinity of a large airport. Typically, the TRACON controls aircraft within a 30-50 nautical mile (56 to 93 km) radius of the airport between the surface and 18,000 feet.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRACON