Interested in flying lessons


#1

So im 14 and interested in getting or taking flying lessons in the BNA area, does nayone have any help or know where I should go??? Thanks


#2

tnwg.cap.gov/


#3

http://www.BeAPilot.com
http://www.aopa.org/learntofly/
You can search for a flight school near you on the AOPA page above.


#4

I was considering lessons but now that school started. No way that’s happening. What is it like $5,000 for a PPL?


#5

5k is pretty spot-on. Thats about as inexpensive as I’ve seen in a long time. Though there are ways to finance it (and the rest of your ratings). Sally-Mae, Key Bank, and other loans are pretty common for students who have career aspirations.


#6

Ahem, free and/or at least heavily subsidized.

tnwg.cap.gov/


#7

There’s one thing that really gets my goat, and that’s when people say, “pilot’s ‘license.’”

There is no “pilot’s ‘license.’”

There are certificates and there are ratings that modify the certificates.

Thus, a person is certified to fly and ratings indicate the further conditions under which he may fly.

So, if you are going into flight training at some point, that’s probably the first indication that will tell somebody you know what you’re talking about: how you refer to what you are.


#8

First of all, it takes 40 hours, minimum, to get the Private Certificate. How many do it in 40 hours and are competent and safe?

The vast majority do it in more than 50 hours, more likely 60 to 70, or more, hours, and, at today’s prices, I believe that would add up to more than $5,000.

Complicate that by transitioning, during training for the Private Certificate, to a 172.

I would not recommend some flying club with a still-wet-behind-the-ears, $5-an-hour instructor, either. I would recommend spending the money, the effort and the time at a well-established, professional FBO at, or in Class B where the student gets the “scared” trained out of him.

Flying two times a week is not enough. More than four times too much. Three is about right.

If a person wanted to be a professional pilot, I would not recommend an FBO at all, rather something like Embry-Riddle, where he can go and get the academics out of the way while dipping into flying, then, focusing on aviation. That way he is immersed in it and gets the right amount of training in the right way, and, in the end, he is ready for an interview.


#9

Try again??? PPL = Private Pilots License.

acronyms.thefreedictionary.com/P … ot+license

Allen


#10

I think blitzer is out to get me or something. Like Dami and noobies. But this freshman was right about the PPL.


#11

I don’t care what your know-nothin’-about-aviation dictionary says. Your certificate says nothing about a “license.” FAA refers only to certificates and ratings. Only nonpilot doofuses refer to the certificate as a “license” cuz they don’t know better. Those who fly ought to know better. I’m aware that most don’t.


#12

It might take you 60 hours if you’re an incompetant moron, or flying in sparatic intervals, you should have no problem at all getting it in 40 hours. I would even cut some slack for up to 50 hours. After all we’re just taking about vfr here. I got mine at 45 hours because I moved to a different town and had to fly w/ a different organization.


#13

Last I heard, FAA stats show 55 to 75 is normal at a 3-times-a-week clip.

FAA says that very few can do it in 40 hours.

So, you got it in 45 hours. Guess that makes you a genius. We’re so grateful to be in your presence, Sire.


#14

OK, seriously. What is with the attitude? Just about everything you post is argumentative. So someone called it a “license”. Big whoop. That is like using the term bandaid, coke, or kleenex. It is a general term. I know MANY instructors, and pilots, both professional and private that refer to them as a "license."
Also, there are some that can get it done in 40-50 hours. I will probably be one of them. Does that make me any better? NO. Does that require a hateful response from you? NO. What I have found is that the time it takes depends on two obvious things. One, the student. Second, the instructor.
I have a very good instructor that as a very structured plan. We do what we do, and head back to the airport, only after he feels comfortable that I can do each manuver in my sleep. I will say, I do have an advantage by having a FIL that has a plane that he regularly lets me go up in with him and work on manuvers. Still, without that, which my instructor knows about, I would probably still be done in about 40-50 hours.
All I am asking is that you lose the “holier than thou” attitude and be nice. If somone makes a mistake, correct them, but don’t blast them or sink to name calling or hateful remarks. It is obvious that you have a lot of aviation knowledge. Spread the knowledge, but LOSE THE FREAKING ATTITUDE!!


#15

What you detect is your reaction to confidence. It has nothing to do with me except that you want to project your attitude on me.

This is a discussion site, not a love letter channel.

For those who SAY they are pilots, they ought to be more exacting, to keep the mind sharp.

In the pilot department, there are no licenses, only certificates and ratings. If you have a problem with that, tell FAA.

The don’t demand precision from themselves, nor from others. It’s not my problem other than to point out their error.

Like you, they will make me the issue, not their lack of knowledge.

And I gave no hateful response.

You perceive that my response is hateful because that’s YOUR reaction, not part of me, nor my response. Take responsibility for your own thinking.

All I am asking is that you lose the “holier than thou” attitude and be nice.

I don’t have a “holier than thou attitude,” and I am being nice. You just don’t like what I am saying and you’re trying to distract from your resonsibility for not liking it to me for saying it.

I don’t.

What “attitude”?


#16

…and that’s people like you.
I got my “Private Pilot, Aircraft Single Engine Land CERTIFICATE” in 43 hours. 3 of those hours were from when I was 13 years old, 6 years before actually starting my real training.
The US Air Force allocates 50 hours for their Initial Flight Training students. Any more than that and they need to get a special waiver. I should know, I’ve trained more than 20 of them. All of them were done before 50 hours, some I had confidence were ready when they had less than 40 hours. Yes, the national average is closer to 60, but that does not mean that any who are finished in less time are any less able or qualified than someone who takes longer.

Who ever said someone has to transition to a 172 during their training?

Thats not true.
From http://www.faa.gov/pilots/
"Licenses & Certificates
Change Your License Information
Get a Copy of Your License "
So shuttup. It is perfectly fine to call it a license OR a certificate.

This is the same attitude I get from most Embry Riddle students.


#17

Gee. There goes another night’s sleep.

Yet, the average time it takes is between 55 and 75 hours for most people. I guess you’re just a genius.

Maybe, and maybe not.

The rush to do it in forty may make you less competent than one who takes longer, who is more relaxed about it.

Nobody. It’s recommended, however.

[quote=“cfijames”]

T

Yet, the certificate says, “Certificate,” not, “license.”


#18

I earned my…

Recreational License
Private License
Instrument License
Commercial License
Multi License

…in just a few short hours ('bout 150). I know that’s below average, but i would consider myself a genius. And please don’t confuse my confidence with a bad attitude.


#19

I might be, though I doubt it simply because of that.

So, whats your point.

Or it could mean that they are driven, competent, and able.

By whom? I don’t understand. Why wouldn’t they just start in the 172 in the first place if that’s what they wanted?

It is still a pilot’s license. The term is interchangeable. My wife’s license says her hair is RED when it is clearly auburn. They must all be doofuses.


#20

Yet, on the certificate, it says, “certificate.”