Garmin SVS


#1


AOPA Video
Garmin Article
Cessna and Diamond have anounced for a fact to use this system.
Very cool system major advancement in technology for us.


#2

SUH-WEEEEEEEEEET! http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b8/CheckM8/Wub.gif


#3

It’s better than FSX! Awesome!


#4

There are alot of things better than FSX :smiley: , but if you want to take FSX to the max join http://www.fs-mp.com. It’s very realistic with real-life ATC and lots of addons that we have made for FSX. Check it out and let me know if you join!


#5

This is typical Garmin. Bringing amazing products to the masses at a price that no one else can touch. Rockwell Collins better get their crap together or their gonna lose business. We priced an avionics upgrade for a KingAir, the G1000 (when it’s finally STC’d) would be $500,000 or so with SVS, autopilot, etc etc etc. Proline 21? $1.2 million! You don’t even get a topo map on Proline! Nice system, but RC is gonna get their asses handed to them in the turboprop/entry level jet market if they don’t get moving on some of this stuff.


#6

We had the demo for a few days and I got to sit down and play with it for a couple hours. Pretty slick, especially with the GFC autopilot. Who needs windows. Little billboards pop up with airport names as you pass over. Towers stick up, change color and get bigger as you approach. Traffic also gets larger as you get closer. All they need to do now is to make a deal with google and have different layers you can check off via downlink internet so i can find the closest Starbuck’s under the nearest page.


#7

I think its funny how a lot of these ga planes use better technology then what the airlines have.


#8

Probably a heck of a lot more money to retrofit a 1970’s boeing type plane and waaaaaaaaaay more expensive to buy the latest and greatest for commercial airplanes, so I am not surprised in the least.

What is surprising to me is that the technology used today in the ATC system is equivalent to DOS 1.0 and it works, and in some ways, the way I see it, why break something that works?

This is not to say there is not room for improvement, but seriously, it’s amazing what is out there is handling today’s traffic volume for which I am sure was not foreseen back in the 50’s and 60’s.


#9

How much does that SVS system cost?

That is way cool. I would imagine that would make landing in bad weather way less stressful, in my very uninformed opinion :laughing:


#10

Cirrus is now using that system


#11

I’m not sure if they have a retrofit for older models, but its now standard on all new aircraft with factory G1000’s.


#12

www.cirrusdesign.com


#13

While I think better avionics make landing in bad weather easier, the avionics don’t make it less stressful to me. You are still near the ground moving fast with zero visibility until you break out. Now a good co-pilot - that makes weather flying less stressful!


#14

Hear, hear! http://img84.echo.cx/img84/4866/agreed8mv.gif


#15

Especially one easy on the eyes that radiates sunshine all throughout the cabin no matter how crummy the looks outside the windscreen may be. :wink:


#16

Real pilots can fly the steam guages and complete a full instrument approach with time turns and compass turns in the event of a vacuum failure. Yes, the glass definately makes approaches easy, but it’s too tempting to let the “computer do the thinking” and just sit back and fly the magenta line (or fly through the boxes) in this new SVS system.

I got the instrument ticket on steam guages in Warriors and 172s, and only recently transitioned to glass. There is no doubt the glass can make for a safer flight considering the terrain alerts, TIS (traffic information), and gps DME measured procedure turns (versus timing), but my fear is students become too reliant on the glass instead of thinking for themselves. In shooting insturment approaches in the glass I began to become lax visualizing for myself where I was on the approaches. I was even scolded by my instructor afew times; once for not responding more quickly when the autopilot was bumped off during an approach due to a bad input.

If the glass instrument pilot can fly the backup guages in the event of a PFD (primary flight display) failure and safely get the plane on the ground then I’m wrong, but I believe pilots trained solely on glass become dependent on the computer and lose or never develop the partial panel skills instrument pilots who train on steam guages have. Again, I’m sure there are some exceptions, as at the flight school I attend instrument students are HIGHLY incouraged to train on a conventional panel and later transition, to get a better idea of the “whole picture,” but it seems to me the whole glass craze has took some of the skill and thinking out of flying.

On an additional note I was surprised to see the Cirrus concept VLJ does not have any steam guage backups. It’s scary to think all of the flight instruments are integrated into one element. Better hope the water seals never leak during a hard rain in IMC. I know the glass panels are suppost to have extemely high redundancies, but then again the Titanic was named unsinkable.


#17

You may be right, but glass has also increased safety according to a recent AOPA AirSafety Foundation Report. Also, at least one insurance company is now offering a discount for TAA (glass) aircraft, which is probably the best indicator of reduced risk for glass panel aircraft.


#18

Given my druthers, I will take anything that will make my life easier. Real pilots fly real planes whether it be steam gauge or glass. Glass gauge still will not land the plane nor make decisions. Basic straight and level flights, climbing turns, descents, ergo landing still require the same skills whether it be by glass or steam gauge. Glass still does not remove the human physiology part of IMC, experiencing leans and the such. The skill set in staying upright while in the clag is still the same.

Realistically, when have you done a timed turn in the real world? I will go one further, when was the last time you did a DME arc? I, like you got my IA ticket on steam gauges and then got a Garmin 430 installed in my plane. Yes, I actually had my Garmin fail on me just after installation (GPS antenna became uncoupled) and had to fly by victor highways. ATC got tired of me 1/4 way of the way through and offered me one LOOOOONG vector back home which I graciously took. I justa ain’t no dummy, I will take any assistance being offered.

Now lets talk procedure turns. Sure, I can do any procedure turn by steam gauge, but why? Why not put the 430 in map mode so I can visually see my progress while turning? That doesn’t make me any less a pilot. In fact, one would make you think it makes more of a pilot utilizing every resource available.

Sounds like you were behind the plane, and that is not the airplanes fault.

Sounds like a “training issue” or “currency issue”, not an airplane issue… Have you practiced partial panel after getting your IA ticket?

Maybe I am misunderstanding the above, in the first sentence you say all flight instruments are intergrated in one element, yet the last sentence you say the opposite???

I have had only one opportunity to fly a glass plane and it was a blast. The scary part for me was reminding myself, this was the “real deal” and I wasn’t sitting in front of my desktop computer and it wasn’t a game.


#19

I will say it again, I’m no pilot.

But this system goes way beyond just “glass”. It is BADA$$ and I wish it was available for the sim.


#20

I am attempting to post a reply some previous posts in this thread but am having difficulties with debugging errors when working with quotes…is anyone else having this trouble?