Wind Shear


#1

I was on a Delta CRJ flight from DTW to Greenville/Spatanburg (GSP) about 45 days ago. Winds at lower altitude on the approach were significant and bouncing the plane around pretty good. As we were on final and close to or over the runway it seemed that the pilot raised the nose more than normal for a few seconds until finally applying power for a go around. The cockpit did call the stewardess who did appeared to be a little tense but no announcement to the cabin was made as to the situation or what happened. On the second approach we came in with the nose more horizontal to the ground with a faster speed and had a very smooth landing. As we were leaving one passenger said to the crew “rough wind shear” and they acknowledged with a “yeah” and that was it. I was just wondering if this was a normal procedure or did we have a real problem?

Pete


#2

There are lots of reasons to go around, and Low Level Wind Shear is one of them.

It happens for lots of reasons, and here is an FAA pamphlet that will tell you more than you ever wanted to know about it:

faasafety.gov/files/gslac/l … randed.pdf

Not sure if Spartanburg has a LLWS alert system, but if you know the date you can check the weather at the airport that day and it will give you clues about what might have caused it. Strong crosswinds, storms in the area, etc…

Of course, it could be lots of other things that caused the go-around.