Which Is The Best N-Number?


#1

So which N-number would you choose to put on your plane, or (all other things being equal) rent from your local FBO, or being the senior pilot at your company would choose to fly in the fleet? What are your reasons for choosing it?

And to help lighten the mood further, what other interesting numbers can you think of, or have you heard over the radio?

A female at OKV flies a plane ending with Romeo-Romeo. Hearing that put a smile on my face. That led me to think of N69RJ, but of course THAT one is taken.

How to Properly Form an N-Number:
N-Numbers consist of a series of alphanumeric characters. U.S. registration numbers may not exceed five characters in addition to the standard U.S. registration prefix letter N. These characters may be:

one to five numbers (N12345)
one to four numbers followed by one letter (N1234Z)
one to three numbers followed by two letters (N123AZ)

To avoid confusion with the numbers one and zero, the letters I and O are not to be used.

Other Requirements:

An N-Number may not begin with zero. You must precede the first zero in an N-Number with any number 1 through 9. For example, N01Z is not valid.
Registration numbers N1 through N99 are strictly reserved for FAA internal use.
The FAA no longer issues numbers beginning with NC, NX, NR, or NL. On some older aircraft, these numbers may be displayed in accordance with FAR Part 45.22.

Phonetic Alphabet:



A = Alpha
B = Bravo
C = Charlie
D = Delta
E = Echo
F = Foxtrot
G = Golf
H = Hotel
J = Juliet
K = Kilo
L = Lima
M = Mike
N = November
P = Papa
Q = Quebec
R = Romeo
S = Sierra
T = Tango
U = Uniform
V = Victor
W = Whiskey
X = X-ray
Y = Yankee
Z = Zulu


#2

5EE just rolls off the tongue!

I used to own a plane that ended in 4U. Never caused any confusion.


#3

I Still laugh anytime I hear anything with Whiskey Tango… :laughing:


#4

I remember a (Canadian) registration ending with RFJ.

The pilot would identify as Romeo Fox Juliet!


#5

NPQT


#6

While I don’t have any in particular, your question makes me wonder though… Like vanity plates on a car, are there any N numbers not allowed?

Like Sierra, Hotel, India, Tango.

Allen


#7

Just took a glance at Canadian Registrations, which are four and five letter combinations. All 31 219! Ignoring the " C " prefix, there is an obvious lack of profanity. Not even any funny combinations. There must be a Canadian burocrate with an over developed lack of humour assigned to the task. Work is slow today. But I digress.

Back to the " N " numbers.


#8

You can only have 2 letters at the end, and India and Oscar are not used. See “How to Properly Form an N-Number” above.


#9

Well duh… (Allen beats head on wall) :blush:

Helps to read what was provided!


#10

Ain’t nobody voting in the poll… :cry:
Six people submitted responses, but only one voted.


#11

I don’t understand any of the poll choices.


#12

So which N-number would you choose to put on your plane (if you own one), or (all other things being equal) rent from your local FBO, or being the senior pilot at your company would choose to fly in the fleet? What are your reasons for choosing it?

In other words, which do you feel is the “catchiest” or most desirable number?


#13

N41RJ: Four one Rome (and) Juliet as in Shakespeare?
N155EE: The echoing of the 5?
N87654: Actually, a better one would have been 5678 - this is what choreographers, who are unaware of the numbers 1, 2, 3, and 4, use to start off dances during rehearsals.


#14

Yes… as in Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”

…and the echoing of the “echo”. You’re pretty good at this! 2 for 2!

5678 is taken. As a matter of fact, the FAA seems to be revoking sequential numbers like that and giving them to government aircraft. Check this out:

N12345 = Government
N23456 = Individual
N34567 = Revoked
N45678 = Government
N56789 = In Question
N98765 = Individual
N87654 = Individual
N76543 = Revoked
N65432 = Undel Tri
N54321 = In Question


#15

The FBO where I started flying had two Piper rentals a 140 and 160. I don’t remember the numbers right off but they were Romeo and Juliet. I think Romeo met an unpleasant fate.


#16

There used to be a Challenger 601 in FRG that was N48FU. That was always fun.


#17

registry.faa.gov/aircraftinquiry … nquiry.asp

You guys missed my personal favorite! N99999

N11111


#18

For what it’s worth I used to fly

N45H

Short and easy.


#19

N666 is OK, but N66666 is “Undel Tri”. Same with N77777 and N88888.
But N11111, N22222, N33333, N44444, N55555, and N99999 are all OK…

I tried reserving several similar numbers with 2 digits followed by either Golf or Mike, so as to have a three-syllable call sign. Every time such a number became available, I’d submit my reservation request at 12:01 AM, but other reservation requests for them were ahead of mine. They’re hard to get.


#20

I know no one probably cares, and it’s slightly off topic, but I was looking for any interesting N numbers I’ve flown. I didn’t find any interesting ones, but here’s every airplane I’ve ever flown.

AS350BA
N29FX

ASK21
N120DW

BE-200
N214FW

C152
N48731
N49396
N63285
N67327
N757HX
N757SD
N95SE

C172
N10DJ
N1315E
N222D
N329AF
N329SP
N46FW
N48731
N805FW
N8268E
N9512F

C177RG
N8207G

C182RG
N738QK
N9112C

C310C N89MP

C402 N402RZ

C525A N414FW

CJ6A N4674F

DA20-C1 N208NH

M20C N677K

PA18-150 N1965P

PA22-150 N7804D

PA24-250 N6017P

PA28-140 N8057N

PA28-161
N2069M
N53515
N8131R
N84495

PA28-181
N28667
N47326

PA28-235 N29DM

PA28R-200
N2079T
N55130

PA28R-201
N2495M
N92605

PA32-300
N4233R
N5390F
N5451F

PA34-200
N1380T
N424WT

PA44-180
N215FW
N216FW

PC12
N273AF
N354AF
N393AF
N420AF
N469AF
N515AF
N547AF
N558AF
N569AF
N576RG
N591AF
N619AF
N624AF
N656AF
N669AF
N687AF
N699AF
N708AF
N712BC
N721AF
N729AF

SR-22 N581MD