Plane Owners, renters, or planes you wish you had


#1

I am new on Flight Aware and i was wondering, If you own an airplane what type is it or if you rent what type of aircraft do you usually rent?

-Brian :slight_smile:


#2

Owner for 3 years, flown 500 hours in the past three years.

BE23 /G

Beech Sundowner N1943L

based in Madison MS KMBO

Allen


#3

I forgot in a few months I will be gettig my PPL in a new C172 G1000 (N2458M) based at KGVL in Georgia. By the way i will be renting it. I hope to some day get a C182T :smiley: :smiley:


#4

I own a 1976 Piper PA28-140, Cherokee 140 Cruiser since late January and have flown it 50 hours since buying it. I kep it at Frederick Municipal airport in Maryland - KFDK - home of AOPA.

David


#5

Hi Bri,

Good luck on the checkride for the PPL, sounds like a nice plane. At present I own a 182S and fly every chance I get.


#6

I don’t own or rent. I fly my friend’s airplanes for the cost of fuel. For VFR fun, I cruise around in an exerimental Lancair 320. 240 indicated @ 8 gph. Can’t beat that. If it’s an IFR day or I’ve got passengers, I’ll take the turbocharged 210. Solid plane in IMC and able to haul a lot of stuff. 180 indicated @ 15 gph. This one costs me more to fly, but it’s much more capable.


#7

I own a Diamond Eclipse DA20 and used it to get my PPL and currently doing my instrument training in it. The aircraft is a blast to fly and inexpensive to own and operate. It burns 5 GPH at 110 kts or 6.2 GPH at 130 knots max cruise. I even fly it to and from work some days as it is 7NM flight between my local airport where I live and work (I work at KOQU) but a 20 mile drive. Takes the same time if you include preflight but it’s more fun.
If I need an aircraft for actual IFR, more than two people and distances I rent a Diamond Star DA40 with a G1000 glass panel.

Phil
KOQU


#8

I used to own a Super Decathlon but sold it years ago. If I had piles of money lying around with nothing to do I would get a Waco YMF or a Siai Marchetti SF260


#9

I go to K-State’s flight school and I’m currently working on my instrument license. I should be taking the check ride next week in a C-172 G1000 as well. K-State has a large fleet of 172’s, a few Barons, 5 Bonanzas, a King Air, and a CJ1. As of now I’m only flying 172’s and Cherokees.


#10

I started my flight training renting PA-28-161 Warriors (N38988 and N2238P), and I accumulated much of my training time in that airplane. N38988 was the better of the two aircraft, but it was out of commission for several months after somebody came up short on a landing, hit a snowbank, and sheared off one of the landing gear. Then, the flight school decided to cease operations right about when I was ready to do my solo cross countries.

I transitioned to the C-172, finished my training, and obtained my PPL last summer. Currently, I’m still renting C-172s, and I’m hoping to get a lot of flying in this summer. Maybe I’ll get signed off for complex this summer.

As a bit of a side note, it seems that people are being trained in increasingly newer and more modern aircraft. I never did, and I still don’t, have the luxury of renting glass cockpit style airplanes or airplanes with a GPS. I still use analog guages, VORs, and “look-out-the-window” pilotage. While I don’t think I’d have any trouble using a GPS, some of these new glass cockpits seem to have a much different feel than the old “steam-guages”. While I’ve not flown a glass cockpit aircraft, I wonder if it would be difficult to transition to or if it would feel unorthodox.


#11

I mostly fly a G1000 172 which i get to use for free as a job benefit. I did my flight training without the use of GPS and find the G1000 to be an amazing toll. I’ve done some training on the transition from steam gauges to “glass cockpit” and it seems that the two biggest roadblocks are

  1. distractions. Having your head buried in the GPS trying to figure out what button does what. Being complete familiar with the system and comfortable with its features will help prevent distractions during flight.

  2. Interpreting tape style airspeed and altitude indicators versus an analog needle. This mostly requires practice but is usually overcome quickly.

The 172’s a classic, but i wouldn’t mind getting my hands on something with a little more performance like a cirrus or columbia.


#12
  1. distractions. Having your head buried in the GPS trying to figure out what button does what. Being complete familiar with the system and comfortable with its features will help prevent distractions during flight.

It would seem logical and prudent that a person would learn what everything does on the ground. Hopefully, it learning of some of the features must be done in flight, it’s done with a safety pilot in the other front seat.

  1. Interpreting tape style airspeed and altitude indicators versus an analog needle. This mostly requires practice but is usually overcome quickly.

Are there backup analog instruments?


#13

The 172 currently includes at vacuum attitude indicator and a pitot static airspeed and atimeter. I think the Cirrus Avidyne has an electric backup attitude indicator.

A safety pilot is always a good idea. I rarely fly it alone, and it is also important to make sure that the instructor you choose to train you in your transition is proficient in the system of your choice.


#14

Nah…That is what autopilot is for…


#15

http://web1.flightaware.com/~dbaker/IMG_3933.sized.jpg

G1000 172 in IMC with NEXRAD display enabled (backup instruments are the three round dials at the bottom and compass at the top).


#16

But, as shown in the great documentary about commercial aviation called Airplane, aren’t autopilots only good if you have a pretty young girl to turn them on?


#17

I forgot to mention that the G1000 also has an electric turn coordinator, but I don’t think it’d be much use for backup.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e356/magnetoz/other/G1000-AP-Elec.jpg


#18

I own a 78 Bellanca with a partner. It cost 60k so my half is 30k. 160kts at 16gph. Very cheap to own and to maintain. My friend is an IA. You should have some flying experience though as the gear is delicate.


#19

Last year a guy I know landed his Bellanca at his home base perfectly fine, taxied in towards the hangars (which required navigating a steep-ish hill) and parked in front of his hangar. Got out, went to open the doors, and heard a loud bang. When he turned around he saw the airplane sitting on two wheels and a wing! Something in the left main gear gave way and just collapsed. Its so odd that it didnt collapse during the landing or the taxiing. A bunch of us got the airplane back up on its wheel using a big board and brute strength. (give me a long enough lever and i’ll move the world!)
A few months later he was flying back home from down south somewhere and ran into some severe wake turbulence from a C-5 departing Dover AFB. Upon inspection after landing he noticed a crack in the wooden main wing carry-through spar. Total write-off.


#20

I own a 1964 PA-30 based in santa monica, 160kts on 14GPH…not bad right?