Shannon Airport


#1

Why do most (if not all) US- Ireland flights go through SNN first? Is there a reason?


#2

It’s the law, believe it or not. All transatlantic flights have to transit SNN before going to DUB, although I think they are losening up on this now.


#3

Actually, I think that the rule is that if a carrier serves Dublin, it must also serve Shannon. They do not have to be the same flight. For example, American flies from Chicago to Dublin nonstop, and returns non-stop. To meet the Shannon requirement, they also fly a 757 from Boston to Shannon, and back non-stop. The 757 is considered to be all coach (although there are first class seats, they are sold as coach, and given out to frequent fliers, or those who paid the most for their tickets).


#4

Judges, can we get a ruling on this???


#5

Okay, doing some more research, the policy is that if an airline flies, say, ORD/DUB nonstop, it must provide an equal number of ORD/SNN flights. This is called the “dual gateway policy.”

I didn’t see anything about the policy being met if an airline operates ORD/DUB and BWI/DUB. There must be an equal number of flights between the transatlantic city and both SNN and DUB.

Hopefully, this idiotic policy will be discontinued. The only thing it does is guarantee revenue for SNN. SNN use to be a major transatlantic stop due to the limited range of aircraft but now it’s not needed as a refueling stop.


#6

SNN use to be a major transatlantic stop due to the limited range of aircraft but now it’s not needed as a refueling stop.

SNN is still a popular fuel stop for corporate aircraft going to southern and eastern Europe.


#7

Just look at it as the Irish “O’Wright Amendment”.