Plane down, 2 dead


#1

Sad - out of Georgia
ajc.com/news/henry/22-dead-a … 65146.html


#2

No post-crash fire.

Weather at KFFC (12 Miles West):
KFFC 081753Z AUTO 09008KT 10SM CLR 16/04 A3023 RMK AO2 SLP240 T01610039 10161 20061 58018

Article doesn’t mention if plane was taking off or landing

Crashed south of the airport and west of the speedway…


#3

[quote=“NeedleNose”]
No post-crash fire.

Weather at KFFC (12 Miles West):
KFFC 081753Z AUTO 09008KT 10SM CLR 16/04 A3023 RMK AO2 SLP240 T01610039 10161 20061 58018

Article doesn’t mention if plane was taking off or landing

Crashed south of the airport and west of the speedway…

They must have updated the article…now says it was taking off. I was expecting something light, but it was a Twin Otter.

If I read correctly it says it was “in a tree”.[/quote]


#4

Yeah, a lot more information in the article now. Conducting post-maintenance testing.

…doing short, routine post-maintenance flight runs. They then were going to fly to a practice area near Tara Field and continue test runs there.

It was during that last run that the plane crashed, workers told WSB Radio. It went down within seconds after taking off, WSB Radio said.

So did they forget to fuel the plane before testing, or did something break during testing…?


#5

N157KM DHC-6-100 was taking off.


#6

Preliminary report states that the plane was apparently landing.

Another witness, near the airport, then observed the airplane flying in the traffic pattern for runway 6, a 4,503-foot-long, 75-foot-wide, asphalt runway. He stated the airplane’s engine noise was fluctuating from low to high, without stopping completely. He further stated the airplane was “struggling to gain altitude and airspeed.” As the airplane turned to line-up with the runway, it “stalled” and descended nose first toward the ground.

Also, “100-gallons of “Jet-A” fuel was added to the airplane prior to the initial takeoff.”

NTSB Preliminary Report

NTSB Identification: ERA11FA183
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, March 08, 2011 in Hampton, GA
Aircraft: DEHAVILLAND DHC-6-100, registration: N157KM
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On March 8, 2011, about 1140 eastern standard time, a DeHavilland DHC-6-100, N157KM, operated by Desert Sand Aircraft Leasing Company Inc., was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain while on approach to Clayton County Airport (4A7), Hampton, Georgia. The certificated commercial pilot and a pilot-rated mechanic were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed for the local maintenance test flight, which was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to witnesses, the accident flight was the first flight after both of the airplane’s Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-20, 550-horsepower engines, were replaced with PT6A-27, 680-horsepower engines. The same Hartzell propellers utilized on the -20 engines, were reinstalled on the -27 engines.

One witness, who was a mechanic, observed the pilot conduct pre-takeoff engine and propeller checks prior to takeoff. The airplane then completed two uneventful touch-and-go landings before the witness went inside.

Another witness, near the airport, then observed the airplane flying in the traffic pattern for runway 6, a 4,503-foot-long, 75-foot-wide, asphalt runway. He stated the airplane’s engine noise was fluctuating from low to high, without stopping completely. He further stated the airplane was “struggling to gain altitude and airspeed.” As the airplane turned to line-up with the runway, it “stalled” and descended nose first toward the ground.

The airplane impacted trees in a wooded marsh area, about .8 miles prior to the threshold, near the extended centerline of runway 6. The airplane came to rest about 80-degrees vertically and canted about 25-degrees on the right wing.

All major portions of airplane were accounted for at the accident site. The front end of the fuselage forward of station 110, which included the cockpit, was destroyed. The right wing remained attached to the fuselage, while the left wing separated. A 21-foot-long portion of the outboard left wing was located suspended in a tree about 15 to 20 feet above the ground, 33 feet northwest of the main wreckage. The inboard section of the left wing, to about 1-foot outboard of the engine nacelle was separated and located adjacent to the main wreckage. The rudder, aileron, and elevator trims were observed at or near a neutral position, and the fuselage flap actuator was consistent with an approach flap setting. Both engines were buried in mud. The left propeller assembly separated at the flange. The right propeller assembly remained attached. All propeller blades displayed damage consistent with rotation.

An undetermined amount of fuel was observed leaking from the airplane’s main fuel tank. According to a fuel receipt, 100-gallons of “Jet-A” fuel was added to the airplane prior to the initial takeoff.

Initial examination of the airframe and both engines did not reveal any catastrophic in-flight mechanical failures; however, the wreckage was retained for further examination.

Initial review of maintenance records revealed that at the time of the accident, the airplane had been operated for about 16,540 total hours since new and both engines had been operated for 3,780 total hours since new.

The pilot reported about 900 hours of total flight experience, on his most recent Federal Aviation Administration first-class medical certificate, which was issued on May 25, 2010.

The weather reported at an airport located about 10 miles west of the accident site at 1153, was: wind 100 degrees at 9 knots, gusting to 18 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; clear skies; temperature 14 degrees Celsius ©; dew point 2 degrees C; altimeter 30.28 inches of mercury.