MSP NWA Ramp Collision Video


#1

Security camera video of NWA DC9 crashing into NWA A319 at MSP May 10, 2005.
“exclusive” video
Preliminary report here:
NTSB report kinda sounds like a broken record…


#2

Two things…

First, how did you find this one?

Second. Wouldn’t the deafing sound of metal on metal and the top of the cockpit caving in give them a clue???


#3

Got it from my wife who got it from one of her co-workers. Don’t know where he got it, presumably it came from someone who saw the footage on TV!

Huh?
Give them a clue about what?


#4

Uh…nevermind. I am taking that as sarcasm. Had to read it a couple of times.


#5

Okie dokie.
What I meant with the broken record comment is that the NTSB report is the exact same information written twice. I guess thats beaurocracy (sp?) for you!


#6

Written twice, yes, but once from the viewpoint of N763NC and then from the viewpoint of N368NB.

Every time two or more aircraft are involved in the same incident/accident, there are separate reports generated for each aircraft that say the same thing except for the heading. If you go to the index page for reporst for the month of May,2005, you’ll find two reports listed for this incident. The reports titles are the only difference.

NTSB Identification: CHI05MA111A
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of Northwest Airlines Inc.
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 10, 2005 in Minneapolis, MN
Aircraft: McDonnell Douglas DC-9-51, registration: N763NC
Injuries: 1 Serious, 3 Minor, 138 Uninjured.

NTSB Identification: CHI05MA111B
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of Northwest Airlines Inc.
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 10, 2005 in Minneapolis, MN
Aircraft: Airbus Industrie A-319-114, registration: N368NB
Injuries: 1 Serious, 3 Minor, 138 Uninjured.


#7

That was some pretty amazing footage. That A319 scooted along the tarmac like it was a model airplane being spun around by a kid!!

How’s come I never heard about this when it happened? :confused: :question:


#8

I’ll put my life on the line by telling you a big secret. I just hope the Big Secret (BS) Police don’t see this. There’s a conspiracy to prevent you from hearing anything about A319/DC9 incidents.

Gotta go - I hear the BS Police knocking my door down!


#9

Did you go to the link I supplied or are you just assuming I dont know what I’m talking about? NTSB Identification: CHI05MA111A is written word for word, twice, in one report.
I could waste space by copying and pasting it here but the link I supplied above should be proof enough.


#10

Yes, I did. However, the NTSB has corrected what was an obvious error. The two reports are quoted verbatim below:

NTSB Identification: CHI05MA111A
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of Northwest Airlines Inc.
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 10, 2005 in Minneapolis, MN
Aircraft: McDonnell Douglas DC-9-51, registration: N763NC
Injuries: 1 Serious, 3 Minor, 138 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On May 10, 2005, at 1930 central daylight time, a McDonnell Douglas DC-9-51, N763NC, collided with an Airbus A-319-114, N368NB, during taxi resulting in substantial damage to both airplanes near gate G10, at Minneapolis/St. Paul International Airport (MSP), Minneapolis, Minnesota. Both airplanes were operated by Northwest Airlines Inc. (NWA) under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 121 as scheduled-domestic passenger flights 1495 (N763NC) and 1849 (N368NB). Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time the accident. Both airplanes were evacuated after the collision. N763NC’s captain received serious injuries, the first officer received minor injuries, and a flight attendant received minor injuries. One flight attendant aboard N368NB received minor injuries. One ramp service agent received minor injuries. N763NC departed Port Columbus International Airport (CMH), Columbus, Ohio, at 1826 eastern daylight time and with a scheduled destination to MSP.

N763NC experienced a reported loss of right hydraulic system fluid quantity during a climb to cruise from CMH. The flight continued to MSP where a landing was made without incident. The flight then taxied under its own power to gate G10 where it stopped and awaited a tow into the gate while N368NB was being pushed back by a tug. N763NC then moved forward and impacted the right wing of N368NB. Both airplanes were evacuated using N763NC’s rear airstair door and N368NB’s front left slide.

Examination of N763NC’s right hydraulic system revealed the right hydraulic reservoir fluid quantity was below “EMPTY,” and the left hydraulic reservoir fluid quantity was above “FULL.” The right side hydraulic system was pressurized with hydraulic fluid and a leak from the rudder shutoff valve housing was noted. The rudder shutoff valve, part number 3772374-5503 G, serial number RON 1185, had a recorded total time in service of 62,436 hours. The rudder shutoff valve was removed and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board’s Materials Laboratory for further examination.

Parties to the investigation are the Air Line Pilot Association, Aircraft Mechanics Fraternal Association, Federal Aviation Administration, Northwest Airlines Inc., and the Professional Flight Attendants Association.

NTSB Identification: CHI05MA111B
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of Northwest Airlines Inc.
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 10, 2005 in Minneapolis, MN
Aircraft: Airbus Industrie A-319-114, registration: N368NB
Injuries: 1 Serious, 3 Minor, 138 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On May 10, 2005, at 1930 central daylight time, a McDonnell Douglas DC-9-51, N763NC, collided with an Airbus A-319-114, N368NB, during taxi resulting in substantial damage to both airplanes near gate G10, at Minneapolis/St. Paul International Airport (MSP), Minneapolis, Minnesota. Both airplanes were operated by Northwest Airlines Inc. (NWA) under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 121 as scheduled-domestic passenger flights 1495 (N763NC) and 1849 (N368NB). Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time the accident. Both airplanes were evacuated after the collision. N763NC’s captain received serious injuries, the first officer received minor injuries, and a flight attendant received minor injuries. One flight attendant aboard N368NB received minor injuries. One ramp service agent received minor injuries. N763NC departed Port Columbus International Airport (CMH), Columbus, Ohio, at 1826 eastern daylight time and with a scheduled destination to MSP.

N763NC experienced a reported loss of right hydraulic system fluid quantity during a climb to cruise from CMH. The flight continued to MSP where a landing was made without incident. The flight then taxied under its own power to gate G10 where it stopped and awaited a tow into the gate while N368NB was being pushed back by a tug. N763NC then moved forward and impacted the right wing of N368NB. Both airplanes were evacuated using N763NC’s rear airstair door and N368NB’s front left slide.

Examination of N763NC’s right hydraulic system revealed the right hydraulic reservoir fluid quantity was below “EMPTY,” and the left hydraulic reservoir fluid quantity was above “FULL.” The right side hydraulic system was pressurized with hydraulic fluid and a leak from the rudder shutoff valve housing was noted. The rudder shutoff valve, part number 3772374-5503 G, serial number RON 1185, had a recorded total time in service of 62,436 hours. The rudder shutoff valve was removed and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board’s Materials Laboratory for further examination.

Parties to the investigation are the Air Line Pilot Association, Aircraft Mechanics Fraternal Association, Federal Aviation Administration, Northwest Airlines Inc., and the Professional Flight Attendants Association.


#11

This is what I’m seeing:

NTSB Identification: CHI05MA111A
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of Northwest Airlines Inc.
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 10, 2005 in Minneapolis, MN
Aircraft: McDonnell Douglas DC-9-51, registration: N763NC
Injuries: 1 Serious, 3 Minor, 138 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On May 10, 2005, at 1930 central daylight time, a McDonnell Douglas DC-9-51, N763NC, collided with an Airbus A-319-114, N368NB, during taxi resulting in substantial damage to both airplanes near gate G10, at Minneapolis/St. Paul International Airport (MSP), Minneapolis, Minnesota. Both airplanes were operated by Northwest Airlines Inc. (NWA) under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 121 as scheduled-domestic passenger flights 1495 (N763NC) and 1849 (N368NB). Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time the accident. Both airplanes were evacuated after the collision. N763NC’s captain received serious injuries, the first officer received minor injuries, and a flight attendant received minor injuries. One flight attendant aboard N368NB received minor injuries. One ramp service agent received minor injuries. N763NC departed Port Columbus International Airport (CMH), Columbus, Ohio, at 1826 eastern daylight time and with a scheduled destination to MSP.

N763NC experienced a reported loss of right hydraulic system fluid quantity during a climb to cruise from CMH. The flight continued to MSP where a landing was made without incident. The flight then taxied under its own power to gate G10 where it stopped and awaited a tow into the gate while N368NB was being pushed back by a tug. N763NC then moved forward and impacted the right wing of N368NB. Both airplanes were evacuated using N763NC’s rear airstair door and N368NB’s front left slide.

Examination of N763NC’s right hydraulic system revealed the right hydraulic reservoir fluid quantity was below “EMPTY,” and the left hydraulic reservoir fluid quantity was above “FULL.” The right side hydraulic system was pressurized with hydraulic fluid and a leak from the rudder shutoff valve housing was noted. The rudder shutoff valve, part number 3772374-5503 G, serial number RON 1185, had a recorded total time in service of 62,436 hours. The rudder shutoff valve was removed and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board’s Materials Laboratory for further examination.

Parties to the investigation are the Air Line Pilot Association, Aircraft Mechanics Fraternal Association, Federal Aviation Administration, Northwest Airlines Inc., and the Professional Flight Attendants Association.

On May 10, 2005, at 1930 central daylight time, a McDonnell Douglas DC-9-51, N763NC, collided with an Airbus A-319-114, N368NB, during taxi resulting in substantial damage to both airplanes near gate G10, at Minneapolis/St. Paul International Airport (MSP), Minneapolis, Minnesota. Both airplanes were operated by Northwest Airlines Inc. (NWA) under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 121 as scheduled-domestic passenger flights 1495 (N763NC) and 1849 (N368NB). Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time the accident. Both airplanes were evacuated after the collision. N763NC’s captain received serious injuries, the first officer received minor injuries, and a flight attendant received minor injuries. One flight attendant aboard N368NB received minor injuries. One ramp service agent received minor injuries. N763NC departed Port Columbus International Airport (CMH), Columbus, Ohio, at 1826 eastern daylight time and with a scheduled destination to MSP.

N763NC experienced a reported loss of right hydraulic system fluid quantity during a climb to cruise from CMH. The flight continued to MSP where a landing was made without incident. The flight then taxied under its own power to gate G10 where it stopped and awaited a tow into the gate while N368NB was being pushed back by a tug. N763NC then moved forward and impacted the right wing of N368NB. Both airplanes were evacuated using N763NC’s rear airstair door and N368NB’s front left slide.

Examination of N763NC’s right hydraulic system revealed the right hydraulic reservoir fluid quantity was below “EMPTY,” and the left hydraulic reservoir fluid quantity was above “FULL.” The right side hydraulic system was pressurized with hydraulic fluid and a leak from the rudder shutoff valve housing was noted. The rudder shutoff valve, part number 3772374-5503 G, serial number RON 1185, had a recorded total time in service of 62,436 hours. The rudder shutoff valve was removed and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board’s Materials Laboratory for further examination.

Parties to the investigation are the Air Line Pilot Association, Aircraft Mechanics Fraternal Association, Federal Aviation Administration, Northwest Airlines Inc., and the Professional Flight Attendants Association.


#12

Those pesky BS police haven’t cut me ANY slack since they accused me of causing the tragedy at Tenerife on my second birthday. Do me a favor, dami, and slip me a note if you hear of anything…in code, if you must.

BTW: I think someone ELSE is knocking your door down (TimCoble, maybe?). You’ll SMELL the BS police before you HEAR them.


#13

I don’t have the equipment to analyze the video, but it looks like a loop of spaced frames to me; not a continuous recording. Everything appears much too fast - the DC9 seems to be taxying at 25-30mph (!) and the way the A319 spins just doesn’t look right.

Either that or it’s been speeded up for news programs to enhance the effect; but most of these ‘monitor’ kind of cameras are frame-only. (Remember the Pentagon 9/11 video ?)


#14

The very first 2 words of this topics are “securty camera” so you can bet your last dollar that it is not a video (the third word in the topic) in the usual sense of the word but a stringed together sequence of still photos.


#15

I’m sure it’s a frame-by-frame security camera, but I’m not even talking about the speed (which does appear to be close to “normal” when you watch the person walking next to the tug) of the impact, just the way the DC-9 pushes the 60+ ton 319 around like a toy. Pretty scary, especially if you’re in the left-hand seat of the DC-9!! Thankful that there weren’t fatalaties or more serous injuries.


#16

If you go to the index for the month at the bottom of the page then look for the incident, you will find the versions I found. The link you used may be out of date. Here’s the links I used:
ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_i … 1965&key=1
ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_i … 1965&key=2


#17

Musta been an old link I guess.

Moving on, what I find unusual is that the DC9 did stop and was waiting for a tow into the gate. I guess only after it stopped did the brakes then fail. Ignoring the “speed” of the “video,” the resulting impact appears that the DC9 was carrying quite a bit of energy. It didnt appear to be just rolling along under idle power.
Question, is the hyrdaulic system used for the brakes also used for the nosewheel steering on the DC9? I would have to assume that it must be…they didnt appear to have any steering control, there seems to be ample room behind the A319 had they been able to steer away from the collision.


#18

I question that portion of the report. I can’t recall the last time I saw a plane docked with a tug.

Preliminary reports are prone to mistakes and common sense would tell you that the plane was taxiing to its gate when the brakes/steering failed.


#19

True, though it does happen. We had a Frontier A319 land at SLC one night with a hydraulic problem. They stopped right on the runway (34R) and I and another guy drove the tug and towbar out with an Ops escort, then towed the plane back to the gate.

Yea, that sounds more like what we’re seeing, though we really wont know until the final comes out.