GA's last chance before being shot down?


#1

Listen to the video on this page. “Unknown Rider, This is Big Foot on guard.”

160knots.com/calexico.htm


#2

Cool video, shot just a week ago. Just north north west of the airport is Naval Air Facility El Centro - winter home of the Blue Angels.

In spring 1995 I had a Marine F-18 fly overhead at about 800 feet, with its belly on fire. It sounded like the pilot accelerated the throttles, I could hear a loud roar, and the starboard engine, a flame about 40 feet grew along with the sound.

There was a 2nd F18 at about 1100 feet just in front of the one on fire. The aircraft went silent, and both pilots ejected safely, one straight up, one on an angle backwards. The aircraft spun around 180, the nose fell first, and just flat until it hit the ground.

I was just half mile from where it hit, (the desert floor), no sound at all, just black, black smoke as a cloud went straight up. The 2nd F18 was circling, and a Huey was there in about two minutes.

In the video, the aircraft lands on 26, the houses on the left side of the video are in Mexico. The little river that the aircraft passes over just before touchdown, is the New River, most polluted water in America, and the only river in North America that flows north.

Funny story about the area, the Mexican side is the City of Mexicali - over a million people live there. I kept seeing adds on TV for Chinese food on the Mexican Channels. All kinds of Chinese Restaurants??? I had to ask.

It turns out when America was building the rail roads, the East Coast side was built by the Irish (and German), after the Potato famine and the good old days when they were all the illegals!!!

The West Coast was built by the Chinese, brought over for just that purpose. The rail lines met in Utah, the Irish settled in Idaho which gave them land grants, which is why there are so many Idaho Potatoes.

The Chinese (CLICK HERE ) however, kept working, after the rail roads, worked on the Colorado River, all through the Grand Canyon, Hoover Dam, All-American Canal, until they ended up in Mexico, just opposite Calexico, California. To this day there is about 100,000 Chinese in Mexico, decendants of the Chinese brought over for cheap labor, and left in Mexico until this day!!!


#3

Wait how does the water get from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario??? :smiley:

I’m from Buffalo and you’re from Toronto, we should know this…


#4

I must have something screwd up, because that should have been obvious to me.

I’m reminded of living in California, and how little most people knew (or cared) about Canada. I clearly recall being told “The only river in the US that flows north”.

As you clearly point out, the Niagra River definitely flows north.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_River_(California


#5

Interestingly, another river of the same name also flows North through West Virginia. :confused:

New River (Kanawha River)


#6

In California also the Salinas river flows north from Santa Margarita to Monterey…


#7

And a river flows through the San Joaquin Valley called the San Joaquin River. It, too, goes from south to north.

And the Irish were not illegals. They passed through the immigration stations like foreigners to the USA should.


#8

Since we’re on the subject of Irish Immigrants, do you know if the United States had some sort of quarantine station during the Great Famine like Canada had Grosse Ile?
A little soft runway there, we once practiced unpaved strip landings.


#9

The Red River separating North Dakota and Minnesota also flows North into Canada. The continental divide is on the border between South Dakota and Minnesota.

Wes


#10

The Continental Divide is further west.
The Northern Divide is what goes through the Dakotas. It separates the waters of the Atlantic and the Arctic.
See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continental_divide for further information.


#11

The primary entry point for European immigrants to the US starting in the 1890’s was Ellis Island in NY harbor, which had a large hospital to quarantine individuals with suspected communicable diseases. In addition every major port of entry into the US had quarantine facilities available.

During the famine period immigrants were simply dumped in whatever port their vessel first called at. By 1850, the Irish made up a quarter of the population in Boston, Massachusetts; New York City; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Baltimore, Maryland. Far more landed in Canada than the US and the largest famine grave site outside of Ireland is at Grosse-le, Quebec.


#12

I am fully aware of the main continental divide. There’s also a smaller one on the border between South Dakota and Minnesota where the water flows both North out of Lake Traverse via the Red River (into Canada) and South out of Big Stone Lake. I’m not imagining it - I live there.


#13

I’m not doubting you. I was giving you the proper names. The Continental Divide runs mainly north and south while the Northern Divide - the one in South Dakota - runs from the Continental divide in a generally northeasterly direction to the Labrador Sea.

When I was researching this, I had now idea that there was more than one divide on this continent.


#14

wwilkens is correct…

The actual divide “proper” names are called for North America

Great
Northern
Eastern
St. Lawrence Seaway

The term “continental divide” refers to a particular type of drainage divide which means all four of the above are continental divides per nationalatlas.gov/articles/geolo … alDiv.html

Allen


#15

Popular usage is to call it the Continental Divide.

From en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continental_Divide

Continental Divide or Great Divide is the name given to the North American portion of the mountainous ridge which separates the watersheds that drain into the Pacific Ocean from… A secondary, non-mountainous divide further separates other river systems that drain into the Arctic Ocean (including those which drain via Hudson Bay, James Bay, and Ungava Bay) from those which drain into the Atlantic Ocean (including those which drain via the Great Lakes and Saint Lawrence Seaway).

Other citations:

geography.about.com/library/faq/blqzcontdiv.htm
nationalatlas.gov/mld/condivl.html (strangely, this citation from the one Allen gave from National Atlas website calls it the Continental Divide (i.e. capitalized as proper nouns), although it also calls it the Great Divide).
thecanadianencyclopedia.com/ … RTA0001889
britannica.com/eb/article-90 … tal-Divide

Popular usage is Continental Divide. Shall we do a poll?

This picture is from the National Atlas citation given in the previous posting.
http://nationalatlas.gov/articles/geology/IMAGES/contDiv_1.gif :slight_smile:


#16

Call it what YOU want, but unless you need help reading map legends, look at the very own map YOU provided, and then gander at the red line, and what does that read??? I don’t see continental anywhere in that legend

Sure looks like Great to me.

It’s not a popularity contest, it’s giving the right information the first time.

That road sign can be CORRECTLY erected at the eastern divide.

Allen


#17

US Geological Survey Topographic Map
Another USGS topo map
Courtesy of topozone.com

Maps of any type - topo, road, aeronautical and nautical charts, etc. - are a passion of mine. I have been reading maps since I was a teenager - over 35 years ago! So, no, I don’t need help reading a map.

My last words on this because Allen won’t believe me even if I told him a topo map is called a topo map because it shows the topography of the land.


#18

Please note, Dami’s post appears to be in error by OMISSION.

gpsinformation.org/jack/Divide/Divide.html and look at the road sign near the bottom of the page. I’d suspect the road sign is lying if Dami is correct.

Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to fill in the gaps myself and get the GPS coordinates to verify the following, but I would suspect if I pulled up topo maps to where that sign is located, it would say continental divide just as Dami is showing the GREAT divide in his topo maps being label continental becuase it is a continental divide by GEOLOGICAL feature definition…

His information is flat out wrong regarding the continental divide. There are four continental divides, not one…

Further more, A topographic map uses contour lines to represent the shape and elevation of the land. Geological features, such as mountains, valleys, streams, lakes, rivers, and vegetation are identified, along with man-made features such as roads, transmission lines, and major buildings

A continental divide is a geological feature as I described in my prior post. Dami by virtual of omission neglected that detail nor does he seem to understand the difference between a geological feature and a name of a divide.

Please see my post defining what a continental divide is and the OFFICIAL names of the divides provided in Dami’s map and my reference…

Thank you.

Allen


#19

Gee, that’s never happened before.

Just shows to go you, you can spend a lifetime studying something and still learn something new.