Dornier CD2 Seastar - any news?


#1

Ever since they announced that they would be setting up their new manufacturing line near Montreal (in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu) about 18 months ago, I haven’t heard another peep from them since. Has anyone else heard any more “news” about the Seastar since then?

And what’s up with its FAA Type Certificate (A62EU) and the note it contains regarding “Import Requirements”? It says “This aircraft is not eligible for operations in the United States” but the company has indeed operated the one example they have as a demonstrator in the US. Apparently, you don’t have to be “eligible to operate in the US” to actually operate in the US… Must be one of those post-9/11 Homeland Security rules. :open_mouth:


#2

From the TCDS (**emphasis **mine):

The type certification basis for the Dornier Seastar Model CD2 airplane is as follows: Part 21 of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR), § 21.29; Part 23 of the FAR, effective February 1, 1965, including amendments 23-1 through 23-34; Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) No. 27, effective
February 1, 1974, as amended by amendments 27-1 through 27-8; Part 36 of
the FAR, effective December 1, 1969, as amended by amendments 36-1
through amendment 36-18.

(Docket No. 061CE, Special Conditions 23-ACE-44)
Special Conditions; Dornier Seastar CD2 Series Airplanes and Exemptions for FAR Part 23 Amdt. 34 §23.807(d)(1) and §23.807(d)(1)(i)
The Luftfahrt Bundesamt originally type certificated this aircraft under its type
certificate Number 2065. The FAA validated this product under U.S. Type
Certificate Number A62EU. Effective September 28, 2003, the European
Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) began oversight of this product on behalf of
Germany.

Import Requirements. This aircraft is not eligible for operations in the United States. Please contact the FAA, Small Airplane Directorate at Kansas City, Missouri for additional information.

My read of this is that it is allowed to be operated in the USA but cannot be registered in the USA.

Contact the Aircraft Evaluation Group for more information. Points of contact can be found here
The Dornier web page states:

Introducing the Dornier Seaplane Company’s new Seastar CD2 amphibious flying boat. The Dornier CD2 Seastar is a twin engine seaplane, 12 passenger FAA/EASA certified all-composite, corrosion resistant amphibian, capable of landing on runways or 2 ½ foot seas and cruises up to 180KTAS.


#3

Really? That’s how you “read” it?

Well, if you think that “operated” really doesn’t mean “operated” but instead actually means “registered”, then what do you think that “registered” really means?

Theoretically speaking, if the FAA has some kind of general problem or issue with the certification of the Seastar (as they seem to have) such that they put that “restriction” on its US type certificate, how does preventing it from wearing an N-number protect us and keep us safe if it is still flying around over our heads with a German D-registration on it? That wouldn’t prevent it from falling out of the sky and hitting us on our heads, for example.

That doesn’t make any sense at all (IMHO.)


#4

You didn’t indicate if you emailed KC so I did. In the meantime, here’s the logic I used.

The aircraft does have a basis for its type:

The type certification basis for the Dornier Seastar Model CD2 airplane is as follows: Part 21 of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR), § 21.29; Part 23 of the FAR, effective February 1, 1965, including amendments 23-1 through 23-34; Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) No. 27, effective
February 1, 1974, as amended by amendments 27-1 through 27-8; Part 36 of
the FAR, effective December 1, 1969, as amended by amendments 36-1
through amendment 36-18.

and was assigned a type certificate:

(Docket No. 061CE, Special Conditions 23-ACE-44)
Special Conditions; Dornier Seastar CD2 Series Airplanes and Exemptions for FAR Part 23 Amdt. 34 §23.807(d)(1) and §23.807(d)(1)(i)

based on the Luftfahrt Bundesamt certifying the aircraft

The Luftfahrt Bundesamt originally type certificated this aircraft under its type
certificate Number 2065. The FAA validated this product under U.S. Type
Certificate Number A62EU. Effective September 28, 2003, the European
Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) began oversight of this product on behalf of
Germany.

The FAA says the

Import Requirements. This aircraft is not eligible for operations in the United States. Please contact the FAA, Small Airplane Directorate at Kansas City, Missouri for additional information.

Because it says “import requirements,” I took this to mean that the aircraft, as being certified by a recognized foreign civil authority, would be allowed to fly in the USA but could not be put on the registry.

I’ll let you know if I get a reply back from KC


#5

Here’s what I got from the FAA:

It is not eligible for N registration. We are not aware of any being issued a Standard Airworthiness certificate from Germany. Are you? If the airplane has a E ticket it may be operated per 14 CFR 91.715. I have been informed that if you require further information, you may contact the Small Airplane Directorate in writing. 901 Locust, Kansas City, MO 64106.

14 CFR 91.715

Title 14: Aeronautics and Space
PART 91—GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES
Subpart H—Foreign Aircraft Operations and Operations of U.S.-Registered Civil Aircraft Outside of the United States; and Rules Governing Persons on Board Such Aircraft

§ 91.715 Special flight authorizations for foreign civil aircraft.

(a) Foreign civil aircraft may be operated without airworthiness certificates required under §91.203 if a special flight authorization for that operation is issued under this section. Application for a special flight authorization must be made to the Flight Standards Division Manager or Aircraft Certification Directorate Manager of the FAA region in which the applicant is located or to the region within which the U.S. point of entry is located. However, in the case of an aircraft to be operated in the U.S. for the purpose of demonstration at an airshow, the application may be made to the Flight Standards Division Manager or Aircraft Certification Directorate Manager of the FAA region in which the airshow is located.

(b) The Administrator may issue a special flight authorization for a foreign civil aircraft subject to any conditions and limitations that the Administrator considers necessary for safe operation in the U.S. airspace.

© No person may operate a foreign civil aircraft under a special flight authorization unless that operation also complies with part 375 of the Special Regulations of the Department of Transportation (14 CFR part 375).
(Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 2120–0005)

[Doc. No. 18334, 54 FR 34320, Aug. 18, 1989, as amended by Amdt. 91–212, 54 FR 39293, Sept. 25, 1989]