Chemtrails and conspiracies


#1

I just happened to be surfing around iYou Tube, and wandered upon these chemtrail videos. WOW!! haha, these people are nuts. The guy with these chemtrail videos also has one posted of an interview with an ‘aviation expert’ who explains that the 9/11 aircraft couldn’t have possibly been flown by amatuers, i.e. must have been trained government pilots, because of ground effect. And I quote if you fly a 757 at 400 kts at 20 ft (hahaha yeah) it will not be controllable by an ‘untrained’ pilot. Therefore there is no way that someone who was trained with basic flight instruction would have the ability to handle the 757 in ground effect. Overlooking the fact that the nose down attitude at 400 kts would’ve negated any ground effect, but here’s the video
"Cushion of Air"
Chemtrails over Central IL

in the chemtrail one, listen to him murmer, ‘oh my god’ hahah great stuff!


#2

WTH???

Thsi has me thinking that, aside formt he fact this guy wears a Tin Foil Hat all the time, he does nothing but spend his days watching Jet contrails and then checking the Weather reports…and I like how the one user keeps refering to him as Dale Gribble…


#3

These conspiracy hypothesizers are complete d-bags.


#4

I probably spend a little more time on the Tube than I should, and yes I spend alot of time talking trash to provoke a some confrontation, but it’s all in fun. This one here, though, wow !
I know I’m not a scientist, and I’m not even a professional pilot, although that is largly based on my lack of funds and a son who plays hockey (also a large depletion of funds, but worth it) but that doesn’t mean I haven’t worked to get where I am in my amateur flying career,and with the fact that I have studied aviation since I was in a low elementary grade, it bugs the He… out of me that people try to pass this off to those who have no aeronautical knowledge.
So beyond the fun I’m having screwing with this guy, it does get under my skin that there’s people out there who actually but into this garbage!


#5

Where did you study/research aeronautics ?


#6

Funny thing about this video is that 1.24 into this video is me!!

Gee, made prime time somewhere and didn’t even know it :smiley:

Allen


#7

Congrats Allen.

I love how someone stole a bunch of random, interesting videos off YouTube to make another totally pointless one. Also love how the “expert” narrator is describing how basic and simple it is to take off and land and they show a cub doing a super accurate, super short field landing. Like any idiot could do that.


#8

Well as a kid I read books about aviation until I was old enough to begin a paper route (age 13) and I began taking flight instruction. My instructor required me to read the ‘Pilot’s Handbook’ as part of ground school. Due to being limited to flying only a certain amount on a limited budget I shelfed flying although read up on many different topics related to it. At 15 I was able to being flying gliders so therein studied that sort of flight. At 18 I started my airline career first working ramp and then several management jobs but being able to work along side many different aspects of the industry. During this time I studied many different aspects of flight. I was finally able to being flying again in my mid 20’s working on both private and instrument at a 141.

So the short answer would be mostly independently, and at flight schools. I don’t know if this is an honest probe or a setup to tell me that I am unqualified to say I know anything about the tin foil freaks and their wacked out ideas…but I’ll take the high road and assume that it’s just a check to see what my experience is. I may not have any military, or black ops or anyother covert experience or any of that, but I can tell you that airliners are not flying around making mind altering rain, and ground effect did not affect the barely trained attacker from driving a 75 into the Pentagon.


#9

[quote=“lieberma”]

I see some royalties coming your way!!!


#10

Ya think it will pay for my “Cirrus”??? Not asking too much :smiley: :smiley:

Allen


#11

I think this is the best way to learn, at least in my case. I hate formal classroom settings. I quite often have a tendency to drift away mentally. Learning on my own is great.

I think anyone who learns independently and through experience has better knowledge than one who has a lot of book learning in a formal setting.


#12

Well, if and when it does, bring it up here to KSPI so I can get a kick at the can as well, that’s always been my “dream car”.


#13

Most canned goods are sold in plastic containers now.


#14

I don’t know if this is an honest probe or a setup to tell me that I am unqualified to say I know anything about the tin foil freaks and their wacked out ideas

Hehe, don’t worry, I wouldn’t publicly bash anyone. I was just interested in knowing if you had studied aeronautics at the college level.

I’ve taken a look at your videos and found, like most people here, that some “experts” can be quite unconvincing ! Forget the untrained pilot flying at 400 kts 20ft off the deck, I’d like to see an untrained pilot navigating a B757 period!

And hadn’t we agreed that the hijackers of 9/11 were trained pilots ? I don’t know, maybe my mind has been altered by chemical agents dispersed in the atmosphere using commercial airliners…


#15

haha, sorry to accuse I guess technically the answer is yes I have 2 hours of college credits in aviation/aeronautics etc. Good ole’ private pilot ground school, accounted for 2 hours of college coursework.
But believe me, it is something that has been a passion since I can remember, and something that I have studied in great detail.
It’s sort of weird how much of the ‘aviation education’ is obtained from non accredited schools (i.e. local airports and FBOs) . If you go through your commercial or even on the CFI at a place like this, you’ve done the same amount of study as you would in college, but all you have higher interest rates on your loan and another title on your certificate.


#16

It’s true that people that hold a commercial licence or that are accredited CFIs are quite knowledgeable, but I don’t think that the baseline is the same. I hold a B. Eng. in Aeronautical Engineering and an M. Sc. in Aircraft Design and I can tell you for a fact that the things learned in ground school are a world apart from what we’ve learned through aerodynamics textbooks.

In school you really learn the math and the complex interaction between fluid dynamics and thermodynamics that has to take place such that the aircraft can fly… which does you absolutely no good if you’re not interested in applying that knowledge to build and design an aircraft from scratch (unless you’re an aeronautics aficionado with a solid math background). The number of unknowns to tackle when designing an aircraft is simply bewildering, ranging from airfoil selection to powerplant selection, etc…

On the other hand, ground school covers many aspects of flight that are simply not discussed in classrooms but that are so much more interesting (and sometimes more important) than memorizing the conservation laws.

Now I’m not saying this to be condescendant or to tell you that your passion and interest and level of education are not worth anything; quite the contrary. I profoundly admire your passion that has driven to go through books and educate yourself on your own and I hope that you get to fullfill your dream of flying for many years to come.

If you are interested in some other books to complete your library, I’d be glad to recommend you some !


#17

I think that is true for some things and not for others. To pick an obvious (and relevant) example, it would be very hard to learn to fly completely independently. you could get a lot of book knowledge about flying, talk to a lot of pilots, search the web, etc. and then jump in a plane, but the outcome would be in doubt. While the internet is a great resource, much of the information that we see on it is misleading, contradictory, partially correct or downright wrong. When someone gets cancer and comes into the doctors office with 6 inches of paper printout from the internet, typically more than 90% of it is dangerously wrong.


#18

Very well stated.

After all, everybody that reads about flying knows that when you pull the yoke back, that the plane lifts off. Or is it power that gives it lift, as without power, no lift no matter how far back you pull that yoke??? Honestly, I tried this on the ramp, and nothing happened??? Oops, forgot to put the key in the ignition, was that on the checklisst???

DURN, just how does that book read in that basic flying chapter of 0.1.0101 in the ground school I took ???

Equally important, the person in front of you in a classroom situation probably has a wealth of knowledge from the person before him, and not having that knowledge to tap into for credible sources / resources would be wasteful. Heck, one can’t discount the fellow students, learning on questions they ask that I never thought of myself.

All my searches in Google doesn’t necessitate that it will lead to the most credible sources so for me to bounce questions about what I search on the net off a CFI is truly priceless.

:stuck_out_tongue: Dangit CAFlier, you brought the bad side out fo me, I just couldn’t resist on that pitch vs power!!! :stuck_out_tongue:

Allen


#19

Please re-read my 2nd paragraph where I mention experience. I think this is where a CFI in the aircraft would be handy. I don’t consider hands-on experience to be a classroom setting.

You can, or at least I can, learn quite about about the basics of flying in a ground school through independent study, as you mention.

While during the course of gaining experience with a CFI next to me, I would expect her to give me more than just hands-on experience. I would expect her to tell me the “secrets” of flight that she has learned. This wouldn’t be in a classroom sitting where one is lectured to. It would be hands-on experience with someone telling me more than just the basics.


#20

It’s true that people that hold a commercial licence or that are accredited CFIs are quite knowledgeable, but I don’t think that the baseline is the same. I hold a B. Eng. in Aeronautical Engineering and an M. Sc. in Aircraft Design and I can tell you for a fact that the things learned in ground school are a world apart from what we’ve learned through aerodynamics textbooks.

Totally agree, as far as Aviation/Aeronautical engineering go. My point was, as much that goes into your flying education from private all the way up through CFI, it seems like there should be a degree related to it, not based on aircraft design, but piloting. The money spent on this training equals that of a at least 4 years. Granted, I don’t think it would have much pull in the job market beyond what they already look for but the point was simply pilots who have acheived the CFI have worked and paid as much as and college degree would require in my opinion.

I don’t want to say that I studied aerodynamic design heavily, I know the basics were taught as pilots but as you mention, everything that goes into it, absolutely not. My reseach and education is mainly in the flying aspect.

I think though ,that as pilots we would have a basic idea of ground effect and that it would not have an impact on an aircraft with a nose down attitude at 400 kts or whatever speed it was travelling at, and that is what I was getting at, not that I know everything about aviation. I can say I have experienced ground effect unlike those who get the term and decided there is some pillow of air that nothing can penetrate unless you have a pilot certificate in your pocket, that’s my point.

CAFlier wrote:
damiross wrote:
pfp217 wrote:
So the short answer would be mostly independently

I think this is the best way to learn, at least in my case. I hate formal classroom settings. I quite often have a tendency to drift away mentally. Learning on my own is great.

I think anyone who learns independently and through experience has better knowledge than one who has a lot of book learning in a formal setting.

I think that is true for some things and not for others. To pick an obvious (and relevant) example, it would be very hard to learn to fly completely independently. you could get a lot of book knowledge about flying, talk to a lot of pilots, search the web, etc. and then jump in a plane, but the outcome would be in doubt. While the internet is a great resource, much of the information that we see on it is misleading, contradictory, partially correct or downright wrong. When someone gets cancer and comes into the doctors office with 6 inches of paper printout from the internet, typically more than 90% of it is dangerously wrong.

Please re-read my 2nd paragraph where I mention experience. I think this is where a CFI in the aircraft would be handy. I don’t consider hands-on experience to be a classroom setting.

You can, or at least I can, learn quite about about the basics of flying in a ground school through independent study, as you mention.

While during the course of gaining experience with a CFI next to me, I would expect her to give me more than just hands-on experience. I would expect her to tell me the “secrets” of flight that she has learned. This wouldn’t be in a classroom sitting where one is lectured to. It would be hands-on experience with someone telling me more than just the basics.

Agreed, there were things I read over and over again, that one time w/ the instructor or ground school or talking w/ a CFI made perfect sense.
In contrast though there were things in ground school or on a lesson I would completely miss, and when I went back and read about it myself it made perfect sense.

Point of the post, there are people making things up about aviation that have no experience or information, they are videotaping conrtrails telling us that they are chemicals (which technically they are they just aren’t the death bringing spy fumes that they say it is), and stealing FA member videos from Youtube for their own propaganda about the conspiracy about 9/11.